Josh Walker 

Okay thank you guys Coming. And thank you for being here with us today. If you've been thinking, if you guys have been following along all day, we've been touching on the theme of innovation and sports across a bunch of different topics. We started the day by talking about how technology was changing the live experience. We then heard from the CIO of the NFL, and how she's balancing the innovation and traditional part of the game and pushing the NFL NFL forward into the next age of sports. We then touched on two topics that are really on the tip of everybody's tongue when it comes to how this industry continues to make money and monetize its media and grow. And that was sports, betting, and immersive media. And now we're going to end the day with a panel on the Olympics. And the Olympics is one of the largest media platforms in the world. The people that we have on stage are intimately connected with innovation as it relates to the Olympic Games. And for those of you who are on aware, most years I start this conference With my co founder on stage with me, she's a four time Olympian, she spent time on the IOC on the executive board. She's pregnant. So she's back home in Boston, she should be having this conversation because she spent so much time at the IOC. Thinking about how the future games would look. She was the Chief Strategy Officer for the La 2024 bit. And she really had to think about how to make that bid. And those games the most innovative ever partnering with her, I've learned a ton about where the Olympics movement is going, and how technology plays a role in that. And I look forward to exploring those topics with my panel. Please introduce, please welcome to the stage my panel and we'll get started right now, guys. This one, this is me. Thanks. Okay. So to set the stage or What I want to do is give you a sense of how we think about this world at the sports Innovation Lab. We have written research and we've looked at data that says that we're entering a new age of sports. And if you are a student of history, you'll see that sports as an industry really started with local fandom. With satellites and the ability to do mass broadcast, we could move to a market where you can actually have FIFA and the Olympics reach global audiences. And now we're entering what we call the age of the fluid fan. And this is when fans have more choice, more power to choose than ever before. And they really hold all that technology in their hands. If you walk around CES, this is what this group is dealing with. It's the idea that as consumers, we continue to get exposed to technology that changes our expectations about what sports media and live sports would look like. So as I walk through what the Olympics and the future of the Olympics looks like, With this group, we're going to cover how they continue to think about innovating in a world where you as the consumer, all of us, as fans can choose to watch whatever we want, whenever we want. So, with that, I'd like to welcome my panel, we have representation from La 2028. with Kathy sitting next to me, we have Chris from visa, we have Rick from Intel, and we have Mike from doubt. Each of these companies have a different role when it comes to delivering the games. And I'm going to let them introduce themselves by asking them a very interesting and open question, which is how what does the Olympics mean to you personally, but also to your organization, and why are you so involved and passionate about the movement? Kathy, you want to start? Sure?

 
Kathy Carter 

Well, what it means to me is a job. But it's actually becoming much more than that because obviously in 2028, so just over eight years from now, about eight and a half years, we'll see for the third Time in Los Angeles, that the opening ceremony will happen. So 1932 1984 and now in 2028, my first Olympic Games as in 1984, as a spectator, of all places in Annapolis, Maryland, and it was the first time that I started to see and it was the soccer event that was all across the country, the power of sports to bring people together. Because at that point in time, the idea that people would would drive to go see a soccer match when soccer was not what it is today was only because it was the Olympic Games. And so fast forward to now where we are today as we start to think about this summer and the Olympics in Tokyo. And then further to that, as we start to look towards hosting in 2028. I really began to understand the power of the Olympics and the Paralympic movement, to bring people together in a way that quite frankly, I don't think there's anything else on the planet that can do that in a way that brings all different walks and peace. We'll have different sizes, shapes, colors, ethnicities together towards common good. And then times like this. That's a pretty cool thing to be a part of.

 
Josh Walker 

Yeah. So when I started working with Angela, she said the word movement a lot. And I, I never heard of a mission driven organization that wasn't a nonprofit. I mean, the the Olympics is set up as a major commercial enterprise, it has top sponsors, a lot of the folks on stage spend a lot of money to use it as a brand platform. But what does the word mission mean to the Olympic Games?

 
Kathy Carter 

Well, let's think about it in the context, even of our own athletes here in the United States, I mean, we're the only country on the planet that, that our government doesn't support our athletes. And so it's a requirement for us as a part of what we do to put us athletes on the field of play or in the pool, or the Paralympians on the track, to actually have support from partners like these next to me or from individuals. And so that actually is admission along with what we want to try to do, which is showcase that. We think about 14,000 athletes. When you put the Athletes together in the athlete village. For the summer gage games, for the Summer Games alone 14,000, half over 14,000 athletes that come together. They live together for two weeks over. So over two weeks, they may have never met someone that looks different from themselves. But through that experience, we hope that opportunity and the end and an understanding of humanity comes from that. And what a what a unique opportunity that is let alone than the fans that come and the people that experienced the Olympic and Paralympic Games. So it truly is a gift.

 
Josh Walker 

Yeah, and Chris, you visa has been part of the games for a long time. You can tell me the exact date. Why?

 
Chris Curtin 

I mean, I just think that there's a magic to the Olympics that you cannot replicate. And there's no real facsimile to maybe the World Cup maybe FIFA but I just think that like Kathy said, I mean you have these athletes from all over the world that compete with one another and are not Biggest stages of their lives, athletically and then they live with one another in a village. I mean, it's, it's it's somewhat magical, I think the top 10 broadcasts of all time, seven of which are the Olympics, so it truly unifies the world. And then if you just think about it on your own, from your own perspective, I mean, they're so sports and maybe even some personalities that with the exception of the Olympics, you don't have a lot of day to day contact with but once the Olympics happens, you're addicted to it. You're addicted to bobsledding. You're addicted to the Nigerian bobsled team, the first team to represent Canada, Africa and in the context of the Winter Olympics. And there's a magic to that story of how they went to Home Depot got a wooden wooden supplies built something called the Mayflower and then trained on their own and in in Nigeria so that they could ultimately compete like where else does that happen? And I think the second part for us which I think is somewhat magical is is an organizing factor with Our company, and we treat it kind of like the World's Fair used to be. It's an opportunity for us to kind of expose what is the best of humanity and what is the best of society. Japan is a phenomenal example in that the last time that Summer Olympics were there, the government mandated the construction of super highways and skyscrapers, and our Prime Minister Ave, amongst other things, wants to have Japan go cashless and have the Olympics be a trampoline and that respect and and so for us to be able to pull all those dynamics together as a global brand is just unparalleled,

 
Josh Walker 

and unparalleled from a marketing perspective, from a, you know, consumer product testing perspective, like how does where's the business decision come within all that magic?

 
Chris Curtin 

Well, I mean, it's unparalleled, not just from a marketing perspective, it's the megaphone is unique. I think if you added up every single NFL Sunday, cumulatively, which sold be south of the viewership of the Olympics, that I'm not even getting to the region to the global scale of it. The second part of it is it's an opportunity much like Apple uses developer conference or Facebook and use developer conference for us to show the future of payments. We got Ashton Eaton who came to us once and said, You know, I love the fact that payments can occur through a mobile phone. But when I go to compete in the track, I don't even need I don't even want to take a mobile phone. So we worked on a payment enabled ring that was waterproof that could get energy from the terminal itself. Like that type of magic. We would never have done that. But for that conversation with him and in the context of the Olympics, and it's a student body left for visa, like we send people to Pyong Chung, we send people to Sochi send people to real the number one thing that they walk away from professionally is those months that they lived in that environment building the infrastructure for the games.

 
Josh Walker 

It's fascinating is it's almost a human resource and talent development and professional development. Yeah, summit as well. Rick, you guys are Intel is relatively new to the Olympics. When did you guys sign on?

 
Rick Echevarria 

We signed on our first games where the Pyong Chang games in 2018 And from the time we signed to we the liver that we had seven months. So talk about execution on their pressure. And that was really a hell of an exercise in that. Yeah. And indeed, were you involved in the decision to get involved in the Olympics? Were you part of the those discussions? I wasn't part of the decision. And it's interesting how our journey through the Olympics has, has evolved. And we talked about mission and we talked about the business opportunity and in my role as the general manager of the Olympics program is really to align and to utilize the Olympics as a platform for multiple purposes for the company. It's very easy to connect the mission of the Olympics to the mission of Intel, because if you think about it, the Olympics are synonymous with high performance and with breaking boundaries, which has been part of our company's history for 15 years. If you look at some of the most recent initiatives in the company, that fact that the Olympics have that unique ability to bring the world together to celebrate diversity and achievement. It's also well aligned. So when it comes to a rallying cry for the company and an organizing principle, it really helps that our missions are so closely aligned. And then the business opportunity is phenomenal. And the Olympics as a platform for a company like Intel that has such great breath in terms of technology and solutions, there are just a great number of opportunities for us to in a very positive way apply technology and the working relationship with the Olympic Committee and with also the organizing committee has really evolved very quickly. And you will continue to see how the collaboration between Intel and the Olympic ecosystem is really going to shape the future of the games.

 
Josh Walker 

And Mike, you can correct me if I'm wrong, but I think dow has as rich of a history as visa does in certain Being an Olympic sponsor and being involved in the games. Can you tell me why the companies involved, how they got involved? And I think for a lot of folks make the connection between the material science and the innovation and everything that you guys do.

 
Mike Reed 

Sure. So dow on officially, has been involved with the games probably 30 plus years, and officially as a top sponsor, for now for 10 years. And the decision now, to be involved with the Olympics, it's evolved over time in terms of our purpose and objective. You know, two years ago, the answer to that question would have been different today. We stand as a newly spun company, got new brand ambitions, with a hyper focus on accelerating commercial objectives. So So first and foremost, we're not ashamed. We don't shy away from the fact that we make the investment to showcase capability and technology and leverage that into the marketplace. I think in concert with that as a new company. We've got brandenburger turns around sustainability, inclusion. And when you take those two things in particular, it's also this great, unique platform for us to kind of reinforce who we are and what we're about in the marketplace for talent,

 
Josh Walker 

especially, Chris mentioned, the visa ring that did the payment stuff, can you give the audience of sense of what dow is really unveiled are done from an innovation standpoint,

 
Mike Reed 

from an innovation standpoint, we've really over the last, I would say, three to five years have really focused on our solutions around sustainability. And specifically, we just renewed our partnership as the carbon partner for the Olympics where we use our capabilities and expertise and working in concert with other partners in the channel leaders in industry to reduce carbon footprint and emissions across the ecosystem. And will that be on display in Tokyo? Absolutely everything from energy efficiency, to reducing carbon in terms of how you infrastructure, the legacy that we leave with the game. So when they move from city to city, being able to reuse certain materials, it all be a part of it on display in Tokyo.

 
Josh Walker 

So I asked you guys before we got on stage a few weeks ago, to think about what you would expect or want to inspire in terms of fan experience, right? Especially, Kathy with you having a number of years to kind of plan and think about that. When you picture la in 2028, what do you think's happening now? What, from the conversations you're having with potential partners? What do you think is happening there? That's different than what somebody would experience in an Olympics at 2020 in Tokyo?

 
Kathy Carter 

Well, I think if we could all look completely in that crystal ball. Yeah. That's what we're going to do at CES. That's exactly right. Well, actually walking around the floor today, you start to see a little bit of it. You know, the interesting thing for us is, first of all, we don't to build anything. And so what we and number two, we haven't unprecedented amount of time. Most Olympics have seven years we had 11 when we started the journey,

 
Josh Walker 

and again, just to stop you, for people who don't know when you say you don't have to build anything, nor

 
Kathy Carter 

get into that, okay, yeah, so we were in LA we have an embarrassment of riches as it relates to facilities. Our athletes will be hosted in UCLA dormitories, which means that today, we could actually how's the 14,000 athletes in Paris today for 2024 they have not yet begun construction on the athlete village. So for us, we often say we have not cornered the market on good ideas, but we actually have the time and because we don't have to build anything, we actually have the ability to execute those ideas. And so so much of what we are focused on today is actually that very question is, what is it that we can do because we are not as worried about the infrastructure required to host the games although there will be legacy components that the city of Los Angeles in Southern California will put in place. We're really thinking about how do we actually change the connection with the fan? How do we actually create an environment that the athletes have never before experienced? And ultimately, how do we leave a legacy in Los Angeles, that is impactful for future generations. And so a lot of that will come into play from a technology perspective from an innovation standpoint. So imagine a day. And one of the things we've heard from athletes is one of their greatest challenges, they lose the key to their to the room. Well, by the time we get to 2028, with what we've seen on the floor today, there will not be a key. And it's simple things like that, that seem that are very hard to execute from an organizational perspective that we've had the time and we will be able to implement. Secondly, we will look at using data from good, how do we actually tie together the data from all the components both technology and otherwise, that allow us to create a frictionless environment for our fans. So there's a myriad of things that are a part of our trajectory over these next eight years, that part That you've seen sitting next to me will be critically important to both the design and ultimately delivery for how the fans are athletes and ultimately the community will benefit as a result of 2020.

 
Josh Walker 

Yeah, again, when I started working with Angela, the words that she used, I don't use often in business, when we talk about technologies like sustainability and the idea of legacy and these things that are very core to the Olympic movement, just to put a little wrapper around what Kathy said is that the Olympics have a tremendous footprint when they leave a city. And you all know that because you've seen the headlines in Rio or other cities where there's been really high profile waste or what they call white elephants, when the stadium's built and then that stadium doesn't get used again, Kathy and La 2028, they're going to leverage a lot of the assets that are already in the city. So they don't have to build that and and talking about sea change, Chris and some of the things that you guys were thinking about in terms of what this is doing. That's a big shift in the games in the way that the games are. Operating? How does that change the way that you guys think about your continued partnership? And what type of fan experiences visa wants to build at those games?

 
Chris Curtin 

Well, I think a couple things. Number one is it's it's just exciting to like work with the IOC. Because, you know, I've never heard that before. No, it is. And I'll tell you why. Because their ambition is such that, you know, obviously, the the event is the anchor experience that defines the Olympics, but they want to get into media, they want to get into, you know, creating apps and experiences are doing that. And there and I think the ambition, to me seems like it wants to be expansive enough to be inclusive of the mega events that define the Olympics, but also to be able to create Olympic experiences between those events. And I think for if you overlay that with a commitment to excellence, that doesn't necessarily spare any expense but creates a marketplace for the best and thinking, like that's a great that's a great recipe for Exposing what could be the best of visa. And I think for us to be able to have bilateral conversations with Paris or Los Angeles, or Tokyo, or Beijing, and talk about like what we could do to ultimately bring the games to life, but ultimately leave a better China leave a better Japan leave a better France. I mean, you just don't get those types of conversations with that type of ambition with that type of resources. In the mix all the time, you might be dealing with procurement, you might be dealing with the RFP, you might be dealing with a one off here it is a Oh, we're going to make a statement to the world. Now, how do we make the statement that's uniquely Japanese, but does so in a way that stuns the world and impresses the world as to who we are and where we're going? Like that's, I don't know what other event has that recipe.

 
Josh Walker 

But But in those terms, it's what you do before and after the games. It's not so much what you do during the games, because a lot of people don't even get to attend the Olympics. Is that right? I mean, it My thinking on it wrong it does visa really think about the fans that are there. And

 
Chris Curtin 

no we devote, we send, you know, literally close to hundreds of people to these locations to bring the games to life for the exclusive payment provider of the games on site and video

 
Josh Walker 

because you're trying to reach those consumers are because you need the story too.

 
Chris Curtin 

Because we want a frictionless experience and regardless of what currency what bank you're with, wherever you have come from, we want your experience to be Olympic. And we want that Olympic experience to maintain the visa brand. And to be kind of a showcase for what the world could be. That's, you know, part of why we think you know, we're well suited as a as one of the if not the global leader in payments, to be able to do that regardless of what venue or region is selected. And we have zero tolerance for imperfections on it and it comes from our CEO down within the company like it is a complete student body left. This isn't like we send someone with a PowerPoint and they meet with someone and then they they fly back on Anais?

 
Josh Walker 

Yeah, one of the things that we talked about, we talked about legacy, we talked about sustainability. Accessibility is also a huge issue in the payment space particular and then we'll, we'll move on to direct. How much do you think about accessibility like people who can pay for the tickets versus creating an experience that's more open and available to other people that may be?

 
Chris Curtin 

So just like Kathy said, I, you know, I think we don't really see a lot of distinction between the Paralympics and the Olympics. And in fact, most of the creative that we put into our marketing features both and I think second is we now offer payment notifications that come in the context of haptic so a vibration or sound, or, or animation. And so we want to articulate who we are and the fact that a payment just occurred to anyone have any ability and so it's like, our vision is the best way to pay for everyone everywhere. And that's the every one every Where's variable. Important to who we people to our company, and it keeps people at our company.

 
Josh Walker 

And we're actually in addition to the drones and all the cool stuff we've seen, where's Intel going to take the fan experience?

 
Rick Echevarria 

Well, we're going to I mean, are the Olympics represent a great platform for experiences, but when we think about experiences, we think about them in terms of our our mission, as you were describing, which in our case is we, we focus on enriching the lives of every person on the planet. And, and if you think about it, in those terms, when you look at the Olympics, they are two major opportunities for you to apply technology for good. The first one is understanding the fact that a city or community or a country has to host the games. So what are the ways in which we can bring technology into those cities to enable them in the most effective way possible, deliver the games, and that entails work before through the games and then we've talked about legacy, right? How do you leave him provements? And how do you enhance the lives of those citizens and they move forward, told you in particular hosts a very emotional place in our heart, we establish our first first sales office there in 1973. And for anybody who knows about the history of technology, we wouldn't be here without the great contributions of the citizens of Japan and the country in general. So we're very sort of a little bit emotional when we think about Tokyo. But it also reinforces to us the responsibility in delivering that infrastructure that makes it as effective as possible. That leaves a legacy in Tokyo, and then that we capture those learnings and we apply them to subsequent games. So that opportunity around the hosting of the games is something that we are taking very seriously. We we can talk about some of the technologies that we're going to be integrated. We will be making those announcements later this year, but there's going to be a lot of positive legacy left for the city. And we are basically as we apply to Tokyo, we learn and we apply to Beijing and we already also applying to Paris. A continuity in a roadmap, and the other big opportunities, the actual, the actual delivery of the game. So that's when you start getting into the experiences, but what experiences are we focusing on? Everybody loves to talk about the fans, right. And when we think about the fans, we think about the fans that are physically at the games. Then we also think about the people around the globe who are also experiencing the game. So while we have done things like partnering with the Tokyo organizing committee to use artificial intelligence to create a social, the beat for the games and the social engagements that we're they're going to have with the fans of the stadium, we're also working through Intel sports to enhance the way viewers can experience the game at home or on their mobile devices, or even on a you know, TV linear platform. But we're also thinking of the great upstanding men and women that are actually going to be delivering running the venues. So applying virtual reality, to create some scenarios that can be thinking through so by the time those general managers and those, you know, the personnel is on site, they've sort of seen and have some idea of what could possibly happen so they can do a better job of delivering the games. And last but not least, are the athletes. And the application of technology to enhance at to help athletes with performance is something that's also part of our technology portfolio. In fact, you mentioned Ashton Eaton. Yesterday, during Intel's press event here at CES, we had Ashton come and talk about 3d athlete tracking and how we're using the combination of artificial intelligence and computer vision to help athletes through their training and help them with their performance. So as everybody was describing, is just a phenomenal platform for the application of technology across the board. We think about helping those cities that are hosting the game and then delivering great experiences as part of the game. And that's really how we get to exercise our full portfolio puts a lot of pressure on us to be honest because it's You look at the you talked about drones, and we did five G and we have a number of technology integrations. When we did pm Chang, but the number of technology activations that we're doing in Tokyo, it's probably five to six times. But we did NPM Chang, so it's going to we're excited about it. But as I'm sitting here, counting the minutes,

 
Josh Walker 

right, you got more work to do. I guess I'll wrap up pretty soon, Mike, you could punt on this question. You're a b2b company b2b brand. But is there something in your head or something in Dallas purview that says we want the fans at the game to experience our brand this way or to know that we're, we're here, we're behind this thing?

 
Mike Reed 

Yeah. But for us, it's really two things. And it goes back to the legacy statement, because I think, the the fan of today, and I'll include the athletes in that as well, compared to fans of yesteryear, and I'll put myself in that category, that they're more sensitive to these things about legacy. And they don't want to compromise their values in an around that in return for their support of a particular Sport, event etc. And so our focus around sustainability, I have to give kudos to that I see your comment about their flexibility, they become increasingly more of

 
Josh Walker 

a knitting comment another exciting to work with. I'm excited.

 
Mike Reed 

And I am two of ladies. And the reason is I see them as being more flexible and definitely changing for sure culture is changing and allowing a company like dow to partner with them in the area of sustainability, to have an impact in this way. So in terms of the fan experience, not a direct impact on the fan experience, per se. But again, not having the fan compromise those values when making decisions about which sport or Ventus.

 
Josh Walker 

I mean, this is where the rubber meets the road. So the third question gets a little harder than the first two. Kathy, maybe you could start us off by thinking about this through the eyes of La 20. The types of partnerships and and partners you want, which is it goes to my point, the IOC is definitely getting more flexible. But the IOC also has a lot more pressure on it, to figure out which technology categories and services categories, they're going to carve out what they're going to sell, who gets to own what piece of this. And increasingly, folks like Intel Alibaba visa, they touch each other in in ways that are cool. paladin ish, right? There's cow, there's artificial intelligence, there's autonomous cars, like all that's coming, right. And these guys are gonna have to play nice in the sandbox, but what are you looking for? That's future proof in terms of like, what type of partners you want in LA. When it comes to technology?

 
Kathy Carter 

Well, I think for us, I going to go back to what what do you want the experience to be and that's going to drive a lot of the decisions and how we manage the myriad of partners that are going to come in and as we like to say, co create what the experience is going to be for the fans, the athletes and ultimately the community. So when we think about it, In that context, how many people today have gotten lost movie going to the meeting that they had to go to? Like, be honest, because I could put both my hands up and my feet up. And so this is Vegas?

 
Josh Walker 

That's a loaded question.

 
Kathy Carter 

But I know imagine this you know, you're for the very first time you come to Los Angeles, and for the very first time, you're not a season ticket holder to the Lakers. So the kings are the clippers. And so you're the first time you're going into what we'll call, you know, the LA Rena not the Staples Center. In the case of the Olympic Games, you have no idea where to go to get to your seat, you have no idea what gate to go in. Let's just think of a world where we actually have technology that will enable our fans to have a better experience. Those are the things that we'll be able to deliver by 2028. But it won't be just us. It'll be a combination of the partners here, partners that we will bring to bear on this experience, and ultimately how we will then integrate that to create an experience that fans actually enjoy. And I'm not suggesting they don't enjoy the Olympics because I think that anybody that leaves says, boy, what a hell of an experience that was. But there are moments in time that you got lost today in Vegas. And that's for us if we can accomplish things like that if we can make it so the athlete only has to worry about competition and not whether or not their family can get the tickets to watch them compete, and technology enable it can enable us to deliver those solutions for our core constituents. And if we can do that, then we will have succeeded beyond just hosting the games will change. What we like to say is putting on the games is only one part of our objective. How we actually make it better for future generations is as important to us as hosting a great games. Those are types of things today that are difficult to accomplish. So

 
Josh Walker 

I'm going to build on your getting last example because it's a perfect example for the question I'm asking, which is, Google came into Tokyo and tried to get Wayfinding rights. So they already knew that cloud was locked up or two Official intelligence was locked up or some other sort of thing was locked up. And here's a technology partner that wants to participate, but knows that you guys already have a seat at the table. So they get creative and they carve something new out. Again, you've been involved in the Olympics for a while. And now you've made a sizable investment, as these new companies try to come in. How do you guys decide what you need to own from this fan experience perspective? Right, this third question is really about what products and services does visa really need to deliver through the Olympics to feel like it's getting the investment may back in an ROI and it could be those soft and fuzzy things? I'm not not saying that that's diminished. But there's a real battle ground between these larger categories of new emerging technology.

 
Chris Curtin 

Yeah, I mean, I'm not going to run from the the question of do we care about our category for sure we care about our category and, you know, we want to be the leader in that category and not just by contract but by respect and recognition and by you know, our partners believe in That we will do it better than anyone else in our category. So part of that is earned. Yeah, part of it is expected. So I am not going to run from that point. That having been said, the bias in the DNA of visa beyond the Olympics is to partner. There's not an instance under which visa would ever make money that others don't make money first. So our entire business model is structured around others success success. There's just no instance where we unilaterally succeed, and no one else does first, or in many instances, multiple parties. So constantly, like our team organizationally at our company, is going with municipalities going with retailers going with banks, thinking about ways in which they work, you know, and they succeed as much as we do. So

 
Kathy Carter 

let me jump on one thing because I think that's a great point to jump off on. I don't think any one of these companies would would actually say no to a good idea, the issue in your example of Google in Japan, It's time because they came in about less than a year ago. And that's accomplished to put that together as complicated to get visa to say how does in you know if it was somebody that was close to them or close to Intel or close to dow, it's time. And that's the opportunity that we have is to showcase how do you deliver that in a partnership model as opposed to this what's mine is mine and what's yours is mine. And when you actually sit with your partners, that's not the way that they enter into that conversation. But if their backs like you talk here and Rick saying, look, I got so much time I got 10 more minutes before I gotta get back to getting ready for Tokyo. That's when we get pressed is when we can't find the collaboration points.

 
Mike Reed 

The different risk profile you're right and and even for, for us, that's been a key learning because because the element of time does matter. And at some point in time you you sometimes have to cut the flow but you don't turn down an idea you also you know we are very respectful and very focused on on our brand and attribution in the marketing opportunity that the Olympics represents. There's no doubt about that. When it comes to the, you know, your the premise of your question, it's a lot easier for a company like Intel, because we have built our business on partnerships. And when back in September, we we held an event where we were communicating how we were helping shape the future of the games. It was probably six partners in before we even said anything about us. We didn't have to write this. We're working very closely with partners, a combination of local partners to combination the global partners, and we have actually taken as an objective that for Tokyo and for the future games, the amount of collaboration that we do with it, especially with the top Olympic partners, is going to increase and hopefully we're going to we're going to end up collaborating with all of them. Yeah. So last one by Yep, go ahead, please. The last point I have to make is that I'm also excited about working with the IOC. I just wanted to make sure it wasn't

 
Josh Walker 

for that, guys. I really will Angela probably beat me up when I get back.

 
Mike Reed 

And I was going to add that I think from from Dallas perspective, we're in a different spot. Because we haven't historically been good at collaborating with partners and industry. We've been soloist to a certain extent, we've got a new co newly spun company. And now we've got this thing that says, Seek together. So I think that's one of the differences for us. Our attitude has changed by virtue of what we've been able to do through sustainability. You can't bring solutions to bear to solve the complexity of challenges that we have, without partnering

 
Josh Walker 

across the system. You can't do it completely agree. And one of the things we say all the time sports Innovation Lab is no one innovates alone. And I think your answers are all really good. And I know it's more of a legal thing. But I do think about like how this thing continues to maintain sustainability from a business perspective, because I'm thinking the IOC is like, well, Intel, you're bringing in all these partners, they're not paying, right there's a pay to play kind of model that the IOC benefits From I mean, the games require that revenue. Kathy needs that revenue. So it's like when you start bringing in all these different partners nice right now she's, like, you know, I do think very specifically about like how visa cares about payments, but then they probably care a lot about biometrics and like, where does we, you know, again, I know we're not lawyers, but there's a line there. And there's an opportunity to create more value for each set of games, but also for visa own more of its share the pie. And that was really what I was thinking about when I was thinking, Okay, when we think about those fans experiences and what technologies are using or what you're selling, that that comes to bear, because I think I hear it over and over again, from people that are involved in the

 
Kathy Carter 

well, you know, I think the world is shifting from and you guys jump in here, but I think we're shifting as an industry from categories to green space, because everybody crosses over everybody appears in technology company. And so how do you define that it used to be quite easy. You were credit cards. I mean, obviously that's no longer even remotely the the the language that we would use. So it's actually much more now about how do we actually give you green space to tell your story in a way that you don't have to share as much of that bandwidth with a bunch of other people.

 
Josh Walker 

And it's not categories, what is it?

 
Kathy Carter 

I think it's platforms, platforms.

 
Josh Walker 

So what would be an example of a platform,

 
Kathy Carter 

volunteerism,

 
Josh Walker 

more of an activity and then then help

 
Kathy Carter 

us co create how the volunteer experience and the delivery of the 50,000 volunteers that will help us put on the Olympic Games and the Paralympic Games. Let us have you be the lead partner and how we start to change the dialogue from whether or not you are disabled to actually identifying your abilities. How do you actually co create with us how we use the Olympic and Paralympic movement to create that conversation, new technology and how do we actually have you have a have partners come in and co create with us a way in a way that delivers the end result Gives them green space to tell a story that is beyond that which just defining your category will deliver

 

Josh Walker 

what I am totally bought into this idea and I love it.

 
Kathy Carter 

You can buy I can't

 
Josh Walker 

can't. What are the attributes of a platform?

 
Kathy Carter 

Hands on the company can

 
Josh Walker 

think about visa,

 
Kathy Carter 

for sure. I mean, these guys are gonna I mean, look, when we talk about the frictionless fan experience their core to that, if you have a problem. We were at a coffee shop today in Vegas, right here. We're trying to get a coffee. And they said cash only. And I swear every single person that came up before us and there were five people in line. They said, I don't have cash. They said, Well, we only can take cash today. That's not good for them. Because they want to create an environment where people come away feeling good about the experience. I don't think the five people in front of us felt good about their coffee, because they couldn't get it because of me cash. But that stuff will work with these around that environment that creates an operation For fans to enjoy their exposure cashless is a platform like volunteerism or sure you guys buy into that?

 
Rick Echevarria 

Absolutely there. I mean, there's number a number of different ways that you can define platform for us. It's, it's an opportunity to deliver foundational capabilities that, that the rest of our partners in the ecosystem can innovate on top of, and again, we've got a long history in the platform side. And I really appreciate Kathy's discipline and consistency on think about the experiences first, and then let's work backwards from

 

Josh Walker 

can you use her language and think about a platform for Intel? But what can you use Kathy's language her example of volunteerism? Oh, yes.

 
Rick Echevarria 

And and what would be an example of the perfect deal? I'm glad she went to with the volunteers because when you think about the volunteers, and I use this example earlier, how do you enable them to deliver a better experience for the people that they're serving? And that's when I was using the example of using you know, virtual reality we're sometimes these volunteers are not going to have access to the venue. until maybe a few days before those simulation and tribulations that's what I mean by scenario based planning where you can do some simulations and you can prepare them for that to deliver better service. They got a new category

 
Josh Walker 

I mean platform. Yeah. Like

 
Mike Reed 

by got it a Dubai. I guess the question would diversity and inclusion be a platform?

 
Kathy Carter 

I think we all buy into that. There's certain things that I think we you and and to be fair, we think about it in the context of somebody's going to help us co create what it means, right? All other partners are going to come along, but it's really about who is it that's co creating with us what that experience is going to be? So diversity inclusion, everyone wants to be a part of because ultimately the Olympics and the Paralympics, there's no there. It by very definition is about diversity and inclusion. So that to me is one where it's so big that I think, but how we co create about what we do to make sure there are measurable, measurable results that we actually are able to deliver that That to me is something yeah We it is for sure a platform question is whether or not it's one partner that co creates or it's all of us.

 
Rick Echevarria 

I think your point on diversity and inclusion is an example of places where the Olympics or the IOC as a platform can also and the organizing committees can also help us orchestrate the partners a little better, because that's something we're all committed to. I can guarantee you that as part of our Tokyo 2020 plans, we have a very specific diversity and inclusion track that we're going to go drive and there may be a number of experiences. But there's an opportunity to scale that to the Olympic level if the partners came together on a platform that facilitated that. So we still have some a number of different opportunities between now and the time that Kathy's leading the charge there in La 2028 to get better at this platform concept, but this is the right direction about it.

 
Josh Walker 

Yeah, I don't want to be a skeptic. But I think it's like also you guys are involved, because there's a lot of exclusivity that comes with owning something. So the idea that you'll have large platforms that or non exclusive and then exclusive platforms is that is that where there's no

 
Kathy Carter 

we're not suggesting that suddenly we're gonna have somebody that that needs upon what visa is doing, but rather, we want to make sure that they've got room to tell their story in a way that diversity inclusion is a great one. It's it's a core object. It's a core part of all of our DNA.

 
Josh Walker 

Nobody's gonna own it.

 
Kathy Carter 

Yeah. And I think that's one where where it's also we're not subject we're, it's co creation. In today's day and age, innovation doesn't happen by itself. How do we actually come together, but that doesn't mean they may participate in six different areas of what we want to do, but they can't lead all of them.

 
Chris Curtin 

Yeah, we picked up the opportunity in Rio to be the first sponsor the refugee Olympic team. So we did a spot the commercial spot on you, sir, Mr. Dina, you, Syrian swimmer, who was with her sister on a raft and the GMC jumped out of the raft because it was capsizing and swim the graph to shore get picked up by a German swim coach who said you perhaps have the same enough talent to be able to compete in qualified for the Olympics and ultimately training at off Hitler's swimming pool and made the Olympics and we're like we're in on that story. And so I don't think we sat back and said, What's the category? And what are our rights? I mean, I will say that one part of exclusivity is an incentive for the top sponsors in particular, to showcase and expose their best and in the craft that they do each and every day. And I think, you know, there's something there that's not like blocking or suppressing others, things that ultimately are creative to the games or to the movement. But it is inside saying, This is your opportunity to expose the very best of what you do that you are the purported leader in doing each and every day. And I think you want that incentive mechanism and there to sit back and say, I don't look to the left arm to look to the right. We're going to do this at the highest and best age possible.

 
Josh Walker 

But I think the Olympics is the perfect platform to do things at the highest level. So I appreciate you guys all joining me Addressing the more difficult questions, but also tying it back to technology, which is what everybody's here to talk about. So thank you guys for joining me. Thank you guys for being here at the support stage today, and we'll see you again tomorrow. Awesome.

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