Speaker  

Hey guys, welcome to the sports area of sports stage at CES. It's good to see you all. I'm going to be your host for the next three days. And over the next three days, what you guys are going to get is a real insider view to how sports technology is changing the industry. I want to first of all, thank Karen Chaka at CTA for having the vision to bring sports to CES. Usually you walk around here you see a lot of gadgets, VR AR headsets and new phones and autonomous cars. But sports is going through a new age of innovation. And the sports Innovation Lab believes that we have entered a new decade and a new age that we call the age of the fluid fan, where fans are empowered to choose continuously changing and really open to that change because of all the technology you see around CES influencing their lives. So over the next few days, we will cover everything from the smart menu to sponsorship to the live experience to how certain properties and different brands are addressing this opportunity. And we'll even talk about innovation at the Olympics. So if you're live streaming at home, stay with us throughout the week. It'll be a very, very busy week. But I can guarantee you that we will have a lot of insightful comments and speakers on stage. I want to introduce our first panel. The moderator for this panel is a friend who I have admired for a long time Taylor Bloom started Sport Techie who you'll see in this area, Taylor has access to all kinds of brands insights, new products and services. They really do break a lot of the news that comes out around technology and innovation. So I can't think of anybody better to get us kicked off here on day one, then Taylor Bloom please welcome Taylor and his panel.


Taylor Bloom  

All right, Josh, thank you very much for that introduction. Hello, everyone. Good morning. Welcome to CES 2020. still feels a little surreal to say that number. We have an awesome panel today. I'm gonna do my best to combine all of their various backgrounds into one cohesive conversation about the future, the live sports experience. So, right here to my left is Craig Duncan, Chief Revenue Officer of venue ties. He's filling in for a very sick co founder of his who is in a hotel room but couldn't make it today. So, Greg, you're our pinch hitter. Yes, thank you. And then we have scarpia Edinson, the CTO of so phi stadium and Hollywood Park. Thank you for joining us QRP. I'm going to Scorpius left is Zach Leonsis, the SVP of strategic initiatives at monumental sports entertainment out in DC. And then on the far left, we have guarantees our cars As a partner at hype capital, and the four of them make up a really fantastic spectrum across the live sports experience, from investing to community partnerships to building a brand new venue out in Los Angeles and to mobile payment processing, mobile application technology. We're gonna try to get it a lot of great conversation points today. So I'll start off with kind of a fun one. Craig, I'll start with you. We'll go down the line. Talking about live sports experience. What's personally your favorite live sports experience you've ever attended?


Craig Duncan  

Well, I'll give the the personal side of it is the 28 to three Super Bowl game for the Patriots in the Bostonian. So I'll put that out there. Now I know everyone feels really bad about what happens. But on the rally on the business side, one that really sticks out. That is certainly in the world that we live in here many ties the LA FC in our Rio match a couple years ago when they opened up Bank of California Stadium, I have been working with them and then new ties with la FC couple years before they even had a coach before they had any players and was lucky enough to be there on their first home match and was on the field before the game with Will Ferrell was one of the owners there walking around cracking jokes in the field. And so that was a unique experience in itself, but then to walk out, and well, first of all, to be in there with the LFC staff, see all the technology and everything they had been building towards come together for this unbelievable event. And right there in LA at Bank of California stadium. I'll never forget being on the other side of the gates with, you know, a couple, I guess 22,000 people lined up to break through the gates for the very first time and have that experience, you know, really truly experience history was I would say the the event that stands out most of my career and one that I was closely involved with. I'm very proud of men to see it all go down. It was a, you know, they scored the last five minutes It was a game, and extra time they scored and see the crowd go nuts. And, you know, everyone that was there that day, including myself will remember that one for a long time.


Taylor Bloom  

Great answers. Skarpi?


Skarpi Hedisson  

Yeah, so I'm Icelandic, so I'm required to say that that has to be the 2016 European Championships in soccer. So we were in France, along with the estimate, like 10% of the country, made the pilgrimage over there and and we've witnessed sort of this unbelievable, magical run of this tiny country, you know, beating England and getting to the quarterfinals of the European Championships. So that without a doubt is, you know, because I grew up when that was sort of inconceivable that we would ever sort of rise to that level. And it's actually sort of an interesting confluence of things that that happened in Iceland. That allowed the players to develop to that point but, but that has to be a


Taylor Bloom  

Great it's close to home. It's a great way, Zach?


Zach Leonsis  

Well, you know and monumental we're best known for Team brands in the Washington Capitals and Washington Wizards and several others. And so every time I come back to Las Vegas, I do get some warm and fuzzies. Inside thinking about when the capitals won the Stanley Cup here just a couple of years ago at T Mobile arena against the Vegas Golden Knights and so it was an unbelievable ride for them. But a really a culminating event and moment for us as an organization where you have the winningest record and all of hockey. Over the past decade, we have the highest scoring duo and Alex Ovechkin and Niklas Backstrom, and the Stanley Cup was elusive to us for a bit and so for us to finally break through and win the Stanley Cup here in Las Vegas. It's a pretty fun city to win a major championship into that hasn't happened too many times before, but Being on the ice, holding the Stanley Cup and and kissing the cup. That's a pretty unique special experience. It's, that one's gonna be hard to top,


Taylor Bloom  

I'd say so it's a great one and Gayatri your favorite live sports experience?


Gayatri Sarkar  

I think my favorite experiences the person with whom I'm wet. So my husband used to play ice hockey, so I used to generally take him to the ice hockey games and totally enjoyed the Bruins, Columbus blue jackets, so multiple games of ice. Nowadays, it's a little bit different because I generally hang around with many of the league owners and we have a different kind of experience. But that time I was dating my husband and I was trying to impress him to take him some of the saga games.


Taylor Bloom  

So I love the thread throughout the four responses here, which is there's deep positive emotion within each of these experiences. And, Craig, I'll start with you and to build on that thread. What is something recently from a tech perspective that has just blown you away with the live sports experience that you Want to see implemented, you know, across the sports industry.


Craig Duncan  

I was lucky enough we work closely with the PGA Tour. And recently I was down at one of their events at the end of the year in Atlanta. And I got to behind the scenes look at SHOT link. Wherever if you're familiar with any PG a tour events when you're looking whether you're at home watching on TV is where it all started so that you can they have lasers going across the fairways, the greens, and they're looking at the golf shots from every single angle. So I was blown away at the technology being used there and how they're, they're using that to enhance the experience at home. But also now they're transitioning that to or expanding that when you're at a PGA Tour event at the course. So if you're sitting there and you see someone tee off and you see Dustin Johnson hit it 350 or whatever, he does something crazy down the fairway you quickly lose sight of that ball, but now They are working to right from your your mobile phone to be able to so you can track the shot at the event as well. And I think PGA Tour is an example of a of an organization that if you look eight years ago, they did not allow mobile phones into the, into the PGA Tour events, right? You couldn't take them onto the course. They've done a complete 180 an hour drives the entire mobile experience. And it's really been something to see their evolution over the years.


Taylor Bloom  

And scarpia obviously, you're working on a pretty big project out in LA. What technology have you maybe been inspired by elsewhere around the world and brought into so phi stadium?


Skarpi Hedisson  

Yeah, I there's, there's a couple layers to it, but I I sort of keep coming back to the things that we need to do really well. That are sort of the blocking and tackling aspects of managing, you know, our our buildings, managing our guests and And I have to say that the advancements in specifically that Ticketmaster has made in safe ticks and presence, and how that not just enables a better experience for the guests. But as we build our building, and we sort of get into the details of operating it, just the the enormous impact it has on the operation side as well. So this idea of knowing every guest in the building is pretty much a game changer, whether that's from a security perspective, or from a business and marketing perspective. And then from a guest experience standpoint, it's just it's overall a better experience as well. And so I think the advancements that we've seen with mobile ticketing and the mobile devices and and and how people are sort of adopting that is, is going to be sad. nificant improvement across the industry.


Taylor Bloom  

Definitely get into a couple of topics you touched on there in depth in a few minutes. But I'll push over to Zack. Obviously you guys are pretty cutting edge over in DC as well, you know, broaden the William Hill partnership. You're going mobile only for ticketing in 2020. Where are you finding inspiration around the industry to bring in some new technological aspects to enhance the live sports experience for monumental properties?

 

Zach Leonsis  

I certainly agree with skorpion that, you know, sports organizations have really transitioned from being small mom and pop like businesses into being big local, national, at a certain extent, international databases. We just did a couple of international sponsorship deals in Japan, because there's so much increased interest in Rui Hachi Mora our first round pick for the Washington Wizards but in general, I think there are three key categories that we really focus in on it monumental uncertainty. new innovation side and that's in streaming where we've got our own Ott network called monumental Sports Network. We're a direct to consumer service that's complementary to our regional Sports Network partnership with NBC Sports Washington, we're certainly invested into eSports. We own one of the largest, if not the largest, eSports organization in the world. In teamliquid. They compete in games like League of Legends and Dota, two, cs go and more. We're also investors in companies like Epic Games, which publishes fortnight and Nan tech, which is best known for games like Pokemon Go, they really dominate the AR, video gaming sector. And then we've become a first mover's and really big time evangelists of sports betting and using data as content and really creating data visualizations that help increase the understanding of what's actually happening on the playing field for fans, and so we're really excited that we were able to announce really a first of its kind sports book partnership this fall. And so we'll be the very first around Rina in all of North America to have a sports book within our four walls, I think you're going to see streaming eSports, gamification, sports betting, they all intertwine with each other. And so we're doing our best to think creatively and differently about different package opportunities, how it affects the live game experience, how to appropriately present some of these opportunities to people who are interested, and then obviously, refrain from showing people who might not be as interested in something like sports betting, for example. So it's an exciting time to be in sports we touch on a lot of different industries. That's why I love working in it so much.

 

Taylor Bloom  

It's great gantry from a VC perspective. Where are you placing your bets in terms of finding startups and new ventures that can help the live sports experience improve that can make money and returns for their investors. Be curious about your thoughts and how you go about scanning the vast live sports universe and managing your path for hype.


Gayatri Sarkar  

Yeah, sure. So, just to give a little bit about hype is hype is one of the largest sports startup ecosystem in the world. We have 12 plus sports accelerators in 12 to 14 countries from Australia, Taiwan, Europe, Israel. Now we are expanding in us and that's why I'm here. Yeah. So having the stalwarts in this panel speaks the volume where we are right now. But having said that we are playing mostly at the grassroot level. There are a lot of tech startups that we are backing personally from the fund perspective. We are super excited to back predictive algorithms, ai startup, it's called tobot. It's an Israeli startup, we led the investment round along with the German media company, Axel Springer. And they what they do is that they are basically contextualizing the fan engagement experiences, and at the same time bringing monetization and doing a predictive analysis with that way What's the next game going to be how the players are playing, there's also a social interaction. They're working with the biggest sports betting company in the world called one of the biggest like be when they're also working with German Football Federation and the publishing house build. So super excited about that startup then we have a couple of tech startups that we have back from the accelerator and these are like pre seed at the very very grassroot level and I was in the morning call with my Israeli VP of innovation at 530. So we were discussing about this some of the startups be are very proud to back them like Digi food they are French startup, they are basically increasing the purchasing power of your fans who are at the live sports stadium and at the same time, you can do a real time data analysis of how the you know are your fans are basically interacting in the game but at the same time, the merchant As the food that the beverage is that they can pick from like, one stop or you know, one tap from their cell phone. And there are a couple of others like where you can basically do a collective analysis and corporate all the fan engagement video. So if you are at the stadium and you're taking a picture of yourself behind, you know, the sponsors logo and how can the sponsors can take and corporate those videos and present at the stadium when you are at the live sports stadium. Also another startup we were backing, where you can book some of the fan engagement moments and see yourself on the Life Stadium and then push that and the merchandise and there is a increase in the number of revenues that we are seeing there. One of the big mentionable one is Vogel they did an IPO and they also bought vokera. So Vogel, they work very closely with the FIFA World Cup and you can basically watch the highlights of a game even before They're broadcasting at a low bandwidth at the sports stadium, which speaks volumes about how you want to engage with your fans, and how the sports stadium is basically not only using data as an engine, but also want to have fans the same experience, you know, working with the sports players and others. Yeah, it's pretty good. So we're definitely having a very broad engagement in that sector.


Taylor Bloom  

Right. to segue from that. Obviously, those are a lot of startups that are looking to solve issues or challenges within the live sports space. Craig, from your perspective, from monetizes perspective, what are some areas that could use smoothing out in the live sports experience for for fans nowadays, and that could provide now new business opportunities for both leagues and teams and as well as some startups?


Craig Duncan  

Yeah, I still think there's a huge there's huge room for improvement when you look at the entire fan journey, right from Thinking about going to an event, to traveling to actually purchasing the event ticket, getting to the venue, and then your whole experience there, then getting home, the engagement that happens post event. I think, look, that's the business we're in to help solve that. But if I'm being, you know, candid here, it's there's a lot of room for improvement. I can't look across the sports industry and say and say, if you look at the fan experience, waiting in line to go get a beverage or food or or getting into the stadium parking, I wouldn't get a lot of A's out there. I really wouldn't. And that that includes on the technology side, I am looking in the mirror when I say that, I think there's a lot of good, there's just a huge, huge areas for improvement. So that's what we're working every day when you look at what does that experience what does that journey look like? It's more and more than ever. It's digital, right? It's our, our mobile devices are driving that and what we work on with our clients is to really connect that journey and make make it as frictionless as possible. So that is you know, nobody wants to download six different apps for one experience. Right and and as we see all these investments happening to drive year round engagement Zack mentioned you know, the the sports book talking about eSports right? It's no longer while we have you know, 41 regular season hockey games or basketball games, it is truly year round, which drives up that revenue opportunity. But in order to get the the fans and the consumer to come back, keep coming back and, and wanting to engage and ultimately transact more with you. We we need to do a better job of making that experience as seamless as possible. And, and we will, I see the I see the industry changing. We already heard a bunch of great examples here today. But if you look at the time it takes to, to purchase a ticket to get in the venue to then transact and find your way around the venue. There's things we're doing with the Wayfinding now there's things we're doing with facial recognition that we're really excited about, you know, I was boarding my flight last night from Boston out here and there was self checking available for the first time that I that I've seen at the airport. I know, delta and NBC are partnering on that. So we're starting to see some of that come to life at the stadium level and the venue level, which I think is really exciting. And that plays into the whole area around security, right, making sure the fans feel safe and secure when they're going to an event in the walls more and more with year round events happening. And then us turning into districts, those walls that need to be secure, extend out guidance. It's it's for all of us here to be thinking about how do we ensure that it is secure? And what role does technology play in that?


Taylor Bloom  

Skarpi, those responses from Craig and Mike, what are you looking to implement it at Sofi stadium from a priority perspective with technology, we're saying we're going to be the best in the world at this, this and this and allows for streaming Because, I mean, it's a massive project lie that you're leading, but I'm curious just what you're gonna hang your hat on at the end of the day.

 

Skarpi Hedisson  

Yeah, I think you know, we do have it's a multi use project in addition to, we're building two primary venues if you will. We're building the big, big one, which is so fai Stadium, which is the NFL venue. And then we're building a 6000 seat performance venue, sort of under the same roof and then we have about 300 acres of other development around it. So we do think of it holistically as Hollywood Park. And I couldn't agree more about the need to sort of holistically think about the guest experience journey. I spent 18 years at The Walt Disney Company where where that sort of attention to detail around the guest is legendary right? And that sort of rubs off on you. And we have been putting a lot of effort into understanding that and what those intersection points are, where technology can help, right? Because it shouldn't be technology for technology's sake. But if we believe that there's a, an application that allows us to do something better, let's sort of inherently build that into the platform from the beginning. Right. And, and that does have a lot of ripple effects, right, you have to now think about, you know, across 300 acres is that, you know, now you have to extend your, your basically technology footprint so that you can do things like scan and take tickets on a on an extended boundary and things like that. And so we've been lucky enough to be able to think about that as we put that infrastructure in. And so that's a very unique aspect to, to what we're doing, but we're pretty focused on it right now. We believe that the expectation of the fan is going to step up as to the application of specifically mobile technology around the around the venue. And whether that is very utilitarian tickets, merchandise or concessions or more a integrated gaming experience. We think that that is a huge opportunity for us to enhance why people are there, which primarily to see a really good sporting event. Right.


Taylor Bloom  

And to piggyback on that real quick, can you compare? We spoke a little bit last year about your project in LA and compared to the foot traffic that Disneyland will receive in a year. What are you guys expecting just with your overall Hollywood Park community just so people have an idea of what's being built out there?


Skarpi Hedisson  

Yeah, I mean, so at full tilt when we are all built out, it's about 15 million screens. feet of development, which I think puts it at the second largest real estate project in America. But at full tilt, we expect around 30 million visitors annually, which is probably about 30% more than what the Disneyland Resort gets, and


Taylor Bloom  

Obviously not all those visitors are there for.


Skarpi Hedisson  

They're there for shopping, right? They're there for, you know, some of them work there. There are people that are going to live there, etc. So, so yeah, so it is very holistically that we think about that, but the the stadium itself is really the superset. Right? Right? And it drives a lot of our decision making. It's also the hardest problem to solve. Because if you solve parking for an NFL game or a Super Bowl, you probably have it nailed for for for shopping as well. Right? And so things like that, but But yeah, so that's what we're we're focused on that on the digital side of things. There's a bunch of cool things on the infrastructure as well that we're doing that we think is going to enhance the live sports experience. specifically around how we present the game to the people in the building. So putting a lot of investment in that as well.


Taylor Bloom  

And Zack to switch gears with the a little bit of talk about eSports, because obviously through Team Liquid, you guys have such a large footprint there. You're one of the early movers in that space. What have you learned from getting into eSports in the last few years, and from a live sports perspective? And how have you brought any of those learnings to your traditional sports, so to speak any of your other monumental properties? If at all, I'm kind of curious how you've kind of


Zach Leonsis  

know we've learned a ton from eSports. I think that both sectors have a lot to learn from each other. One of the reasons why we're so intrigued by eSports is because eSports is the first live event category that's digital first and when Your second forever traditional sports have been dominated by the traditional cable model. And as we see increasing pressure on the bundle from cord cutting and cord shaving, it's, it's really instructive to see how a brand new category is creating a business around a mass audience gathered online and an audience that's being galvanized across the world. The world championships for league of legends that teamliquid competed in, literally drew hundreds of millions of unique viewers. And there's a lot of criticism about what what is apples to apples against the Nielsen rating points and all that. I do think that's going to get sorted out. So we have a lot to learn in terms of streaming technologies, and then how they monetize they're not charging traditional paywall subscription products, like your your S VOD Ott companies out there. They're they're implementing what I would call unorthodox product bundles where you can get keyboard enhancements and special badges and shout outs by your favorite caster, the esports audience really is rabid about credibility. You have to have great credibility in the space, you can really sniff out bad actors and people who are just trying to fake it to be there. You really have to treat these players in these athletes with respect and we do we treat them the same way we treat Alex Ovechkin or Bradley Beal on the wizards, they have their own training facilities, they have their own team doctors, their own nutritionists. And you know now the stakes are high. They're competing for cash prizes of $10 million. plus over the course of a 48 hour weekend. You know that little incremental spurt of energy that you get because you eat healthier and because you train better, really does make a difference. And there are studies out there that show that you know past the age of 27 or 28 your twitch reflex starts to fade, there's a prime in eSports. Just like there is a traditional sport. And I think when we share that with a lot of people, they go, how could that be? They're sitting down and playing video games. When you're playing against the very best in the world, the cream of the crop. That certainly happens. And I also think that you know, a lot of people hear about eSports and they immediately think, oh, eSports is selling out a 20,000 person building. That's not always the case. Those are the Super Bowl like moments. I think eSports is growing into a live event category. They're filling 500 person venues for regular season matches. Mid majors are selling, you know, 1500 to 5000 tickets, and then they're growing into the 20,000 person venues for worlds they're selling out 50,000 person stadiums in China and South Korea, I mean, its own believable, but these events have become great gathering points for communities, they almost feel more like conventions. People are dressing up like their favorite characters. They're meeting people for the first time that they've bonded with an online. I think that eSports very much so is as much of a social media platform as any of the other ones out there so many kids are wrapping up their their day at school and coming home and putting a headset on and playing fortnight and that's how they socialize and communicate with friends. Those are things that are very, very different from the traditional sports world. And traditional sports are endowed with being great community enablers. I always talk about sports being a religion and if sports is a religion, then the arena or the stadium is the cathedral we'd like to gather all those people together. So there's certainly a lot of crossover and and a lot that we can learn from each other and we're really happy we've learned a lot in these past five years.


Taylor Bloom  

Gayatri, from your perspective, with all the accelerators hype has around the world. I think you have a unique global perspective Zacks are to touch a little bit on just how just eSports is one example. you're filling 50,000 person stadium And China and Korea when you're running these, or when hype is running these accelerators around the world are their key differences that some startups are taking to approach the live sports experience. And maybe there's some there's a problem that's happening in China, that's not happening in Germany, etc. I'm curious from your global perspective, any takeaways you have just about how the LiFE sports experience is different around the world, or any key similarities as well. It's kind of a broad question for you, but I will


Gayatri Sarkar  

Yeah, I know, it's a broad question. So for us, whenever we are doing the accelerator from the hype, sports innovation, it's mostly like with whom we are partnering with. So we have partnership with Soccer League FC Milan, so if you're partnering us whenever we are touching some of the tech startups we want to make sure that they these technologies are well integrated with that particular venue with that particular team. But then whenever we are partnering with an university and others is a different kind of experiences. eSports is something that we're still analyzing with understanding the market. That's why we are launching the world's first eSports accelerator at cuan with ESL SK Gaming and again with PepsiCo on they, they are an investor at SK Gaming. It's a big market in Europe is a like a big player in that space. But from the fund perspective, I'm trying to I and my other partners are trying to understand the investment theses that where we want to play in the esports area. Personally, I'm very much interested in the cognitive analysis of the players that how the players they don't have to spend like 18 hours in front of the screen. But we can do an assessment, a SWOT analysis that how can they play around their strengths and weaknesses and optimum that optimize that experiences? So we're looking at few startups at the pre seed and seed rounds They actually came are coming from us. We haven't seen that at Europe or other area. In terms of Esports. As such, there's one startup in the game that came from Israel that we are backing, they are trying to have a different experience of bringing the streaming services from one area like instead of multiple screen, they are trying to bring it in one screen. But eSports we are still analyzing and it's a it's a very different new for us as an accelerator and as a fund. And we are definitely very bullish about that market. Yeah.


Taylor Bloom  

Exactly like what you said about eSports being a social network, especially something like fortnight I kind of want to talk about that barrier. If there is any between the literal live sports experience with someone buys a ticket to an upcoming Rams game in 2020. And they're in the stadium versus they choose not to buy a ticket. They're still at home on their couch. How is that barrier being bridged nowadays real monetization perspective? Craig and I think eSports kind of made my mind go there because it's really interesting. You're right. It's it's kind of this connective tissue of you can still monetize fans, even if they're at home on their couch if you have really good technology, fan engagement opportunities, potentially. What do you think about that from a venue Ty's perspective? Craig and how do you kind of bridge the gap from couch to seat at the stadium?


Craig Duncan  

Well, technology comes in and plays a role you heard Josh kickoff sports Innovation Lab, their whole concept around the fluid fan, I think it's absolutely relevant to this, what we're talking about here, it technology is going to enable that flute fluid fan to call the shots, if you will, I think we're really going to see that evolve more and more over the next three to five years where it's it's going to be you think of an Esports fan or a you know, a fan of a hockey team or basketball team, etc. It's really it. It's going to be technology centric. They'll be calling the shots on whether or not what their experience is going to look like. Right? What what are you able to also upsell them along the way. We talked about monetization, there's two sides of that. There's the sponsorship side, which I also think there's a great room for opportunity. We're seeing some great examples come up where digital payments continue to rise in the the adoption at the consumer level, that opens the door like your your stadium naming rights, right? Yeah, you have a lot of financial companies coming in. And they want to be they want to be ingrained in the fan experience. It's not putting a logo or a name on that those that's 510 years ago, they want to be ingrained in the experience in this huge monetization, not just on a stadium naming rights. But within an AR world. There's a mobile wallet, and that's driving transactions, not even just in the venue but expanding into a district. Right so that that that closed loop system is no longer just the venue it expands out and can also Go into the living room. So technology plays a huge role huge monetization opportunities just within digital payments alone. But then on the experience side, I think we'll see more and more of the, the team and the venue operators offering up and upselling, if you will, to the consumer level, these unique experiences, whether it's on the field or in technology, we'll make that to the examples that were shared the data that you have, you can now do that in almost real time and have it be personalized. You can know if Zach is a huge hockey fan versus an Esports fan, or maybe he's both and then personalize that offer and near real time.


Taylor Bloom  

Right. And that and that's a segue into something I want to go back into what Scarpa mentioned earlier about knowing everyone who's on your property, essentially and at a Hollywood Park, what does that what new opportunities come from that that may not have been around three, five years ago, not that long ago, where you now know people are walking through, they're an NFL fan, they're going to shop at this brand


Skarpi Hedisson  

I think I mean, the first and foremost is the security side of it. Just understanding who's in your building, making sure that the integrity of the ticket is is is being upheld, etc and reducing fraud and issues with customer support and service. It's just a that's a huge part of it right. But But on top of that, this sort of idea that you you understand your guests better right you, you know what, how they spend time with you, it allows you to be much more targeted in your messaging. We of course, we will have two NFL teams but you know, we will, we will have multitude of other events, we we are probably looking at around, you know, 70 to 100 dates in the performance menu. So this idea that being able to pair people with the things that They're interested in an efficient way and deliver whether that's marketing messages or sponsorship messages is, is pretty much a game changer. Right. And, and I think if you look at other industries that have sort of shifted in that direction, and, and, and the impact that it has, I think we are about to see that come much more into play in sports and entertainment. And it's an interesting time when that's happening because we're also basically in this time where the state of California for example, is tightening regulation around data privacy and, and, and usage, right. And so you inherently have to build these, these systems, if you will, and these engagements with your guests with that in mind. And so it has to be organically designed to, to, you know, pass those regulatory hurdles, because that's not going away. And so we sort of have to deal with that. And I think that's an also a big thing that you know, certainly from from us, very sort of old school paper ticketing, run your business on a spreadsheet type approach to a modern digital enterprise. having to deal with those privacy and security concerns is going to be something that everyone has to has to take on.


Taylor Bloom  

And Zack out in DC, I think of your arena, you know, where the Wizards, Capitals play, etc, it's in downtown, it's embedded within the restaurants and bars around in the in the DC downtown area there. How does kind of your brain and property spill out after the games and you still kind of have a presence on the experience that the fans have of attending, you know, wizards game for example, because it in a way it's similar to Hollywood Park as well. It's not just about getting your ticket, gone through the check in and then you're in your stand. It's all about hours you spend leading up to the game at a restaurant or coming out of it. How does that, you know, I think

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