Jamie Boone 

Okay. Hi, everybody. Good afternoon. Thanks so much for being here and joining us today. I'm Jamie Boone. I'm the Vice President of government affairs for the consumer Technology Association. Welcome to our panel, taking off innovations in transportation. And the past decade, we've seen an explosion of innovation and how we get around. From advanced Driver Assist technologies and micro mobility options like scooters and bikes that we have access to today to Hyperloop self driving cars and flying air taxis in the future. The world of mobility has never been more exciting. Today, we will talk with leaders in industry and government about how they are working to incorporate these technologies in our daily lives safely and effectively. So I'm joined on stage or to my left by Lauren live who is Director of Public Policy at lift, a thought leader in policy relating to ride sharing, micro mobility and self driving vehicles. Next we have Geraldo intergrate on head of government relations at Aurora, who leads the effort to engage with federal, state and local governments as a rora helps to find the future of self driving policy and ensure safety is the core of everything at the company. Next we have Dee Williams, who's the Deputy Associate Administrator of vehicle safety research can tell she's the government one. But that title, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, or nitsa Dee leads the development and implementation of vehicle safety research initiatives for innovative technologies. Next, we have Florida State Senator Jeff Brandes, a leader and transportation policy who sponsored the law allowing fully autonomous driverless vehicles to operate on Florida's roads. And finally, we have Dr. Anat Bonshtien, chairman and director of the fuel choices and Smart Mobility initiative in the Israel Prime Minister's Office. Anat works Position Israel as a center of knowledge, for Smart Mobility, and to promote innovative solutions for transportation. So to get us started, we'll just kind of set the stage a little bit and what we're talking about when we talk about the future of transportation. So I'd like to ask each of you your perspectives on what the major trends are, that are impacting transportation and what changes are coming. And you know, if you could talk a little bit about the benefits of those, why, why we're talking about them, that would be great. So we'll start with you. Great.

 
Lauren Belive 

Before I get started, first I want to thank Jamie and CTA and CES for being here. And I want to just see a show of hands. How many people here have used rideshare before? Excellent. How many people here own a car? Okay, so 15 is about the same? Well, it's so interesting, because seven years ago, you would have never gotten into an unmarked car with a stranger because that's what your mom told you not to do. And now people are doing it. millions of times a day. And I think that's kind of setting the stage on where technology is going. Right now, autonomous vehicles are not into fruition yet. But in seven years, 10 years, we're going to be seeing a huge revolutionary consumer trend going in that direction. In terms of multimodal, you know, lifts goal is to be the best world's best transportation. And it doesn't just mean the car. It's it's something where if someone owns a car, and it's one person per vehicle, maybe they're not doing it, right. You think about millennials, they're getting more and more market buying power now, and do they want the burdens of ownership or they want the access to service and I think we're seeing that trend increase more and more. And when you're looking at products like lift you do you have the option of having a ride by yourself, but you can also have a shared ride. You can also take a scooter and nine of our markets and lift is also the largest Bike Share company in the country. So you can take that bikes. And one of our most exciting features is also our integration with transit. A quarter of all of our rides are happening 25 meters from a transit station people are using lift as a first and last mile solution. And I think that's a really exciting way to think of a multimodal universe, on how people are going to be able to really have better access to jobs to groceries into their cities overall, through better transportation.

 
Gerado Interiano 

Thank you as well for having us here today. And thank you guys for joining this panel. So I have the opportunity to work at Aurora, Aurora, his mission is to deliver the benefits of self driving technology safely, quickly and broadly, safely because it's part of everything that we do as part of our mission as part of our core. It's in every process and every step that we implement within the company quickly because we believe that anything that's worth doing is worth being done quickly, that we lose 40,000 Americans in the US every year due to car accident. And we think that that's a huge driver for us to be able to make a change and to bring about a technology that could save those lives. And the thing that excites me the most is broadly, broadly because we want this technology which could be deployed across multiple different platforms. So one of the things that we're really excited about doing in 2020 is deploying the Aurora driver on a tractor trailer and on Pacific us. It's building the safety case, we believe it is our responsibility as industry and as a company to explain to the public, what does it mean to be safer than a human driver? Thanks to nitsa and the incredible data that they compile, we're going through that data to understand how is it and why is it the drivers get into car accidents? What are the conditions that caused them to be in those positions? And trying to break that down so that we can better answer the question, what does it mean to be safer than a human driver? We've made a commitment that we will not deploy a self driving car on public roads today without a human driver until we can show that our technology is safer than a human driver. That is part of what drives us and the Opportunity is it's an economic opportunity to give you guys some perspective, the advertising industry is about $150 billion that are spent a year some of some of the world's biggest companies today are based off of that. When it comes to the shipping of goods, it's $1.5 trillion. And when it comes to transportation is 1.1 trillion. That's 10 and seven x more than the advertising industry. So for us, there's a huge economic opportunity to disrupt that industry and to figure out ways that we can shift and move people and goods more safely across the space. So we're here excited to be with you guys today and look forward to the rest of the panel.

 
Dee Williams 

Great. So I also echo and just want to thank everyone for being here. Also, Jamie, thank you for having me, and for having nitsa and duty represented on this panel. So for us, of course we serve as servants to all of you to all all of our family or friends. We are public servants and with that comes a great responsibility. Where our mission it is safety. That's our number one priority at the department and at nitsa. So we want to foster the innovation but at the same time, we need to exercise due diligence. And we want companies to do the same, just to ensure that when we roll out or deploy these technologies that we are doing in a safe manner. So what we're working on and what we're actually seeing, like a, even a sea change for us, is, right now we have various 11 different model administrations under the department. And what we're seeing with these transformative technologies are the lines are becoming merged or blurry as to where that jurisdiction falls. So earlier, last year, actually, in the spring, Secretary Chow announced our non traditional and emerging technologies Council. And it was just for that reason, because we are seeing all these differing and innovative technologies from the micro mobility to the urban air, mobility, you name it. We're seeing them And we're thinking to ourselves, these projects are being brought forth, not just to us, but also to state and local governments. And we're here to help facilitate, how do we get them to the market safely. We want to ensure and come up with ways where we do have existing standards. But there's also the the guidance and standards aren't keeping up, we need to modernize our own thinking. And that's something we've been looking at internally. And and I would say, you know, if anyone hasn't seen the notice on the net council that does closed later this week, we are looking for input as to other projects that are being brought forth, and how we as the department and also as nifa can help both you all being the companies, but also our state and local government partners to deploy that innovation.

 
Jeff Brandes 

Thanks. Well, let me tell you a little bit about Florida and the Florida State with 21 million People growing by about 1000 people a day that are moving to our great state. But beyond that we have 120 million tourists that come and visit our beautiful beaches or come visit Disney every year. And so it creates an incredible strain on obviously our resources statewide transportation resources especially. And so a number of years ago, we began to work on creating more opportunities for transfer technology to play a role in helping us deal with some of the challenges of transportation. So we started with the first law back in 2012. We were the second state behind Nevada to implement a self driving car law that was really focused on testing. And so we we then shifted in 2014, to create some space some gray area to to look more at operations and deployments. And now we're looking and we've just kind of completed our 3.0 version in 2019 and are really focused on deployments and operations going forward. And I think what makes Florida different is our regulatory model is more More insurance based or it's especially insurance based, we take what we learned from working with Uber and Lyft. And working with through their insurance standards. And we've applied them to the autonomous vehicle space. So today, you can operate an autonomous vehicle level four or five in Florida, for testing or for operations or for deployments. And you have to have a million dollars worth of insurance. And that's, that's the standard, as opposed to working in other states where there's a lot more regulatory hurdles a lot more bureaucracy. We think the interesting thing about the insurance standard is that it will will evolve with the companies without us having to go rewrite the walls, the insurance companies will consistently get better at determining what should is appropriate for those companies. And so we're excited to see what's going on in Florida and with our standard. I think the other important thing to note is we have a number of companies that are already deployed in Florida. So we have Argo AI that's down in Miami. Probably one of the most challenging cities in the nation. If you think about the city of ski slopes is the double Black Diamond of cities to deploy into. And so we're excited about Argo AI. We also have voyage that's operating in the villages. We have Starsky robotics that's operating on the turnpike, and doing trucking operations. But we're also seeing development begin to shift into. We're into thinking more about automated vehicles and automated shuttles. So we have whole residential developments being built around autonomy, and that is with Babcock ranch and some of the other facilities that we have in in Florida. So we see this as an area that will help our residents obviously, many seniors live in Florida. And so we're especially keen on thinking about how autonomy will do will shift forward as we think about a growing and aging population and dealing with the other immense challenges of growing by 1000 people a day.

 
Anat Bonshtien 

So by the time we reached me, I almost forgot the question, but Any anyways to talk about how what you mentioned how we see as an organization, innovation and transportation. So from the government standpoint, what we see is that there's like the the buzzwords of the connected, autonomous, shared and electric, each trend going on. And we have here the shared and the end the autonomous. But for us as a government, what is important is to have all four of them together combined in order to actually achieve the really impacts on transportation. That's the one thing and that's why it is what we're trying to promote all four of them together both on the innovation and promoting innovation, but also on the deployment side. That's one thing the other thing is, we we look at the same old school transportation modes still to exist, but add to that all the new mobility forms, some of them we can are already there, like micro mobility and the shared but like you mentioned, the next generation technologies like Hyperloop, or aertex Things like that. So everything needs to be combined. And as a regulator, we have a very, very areas say focus on that, and the importance of that. And in Israel, what we have is, again, a lot of innovation, you probably know Mobileye, but it's not just Mobileye. There's like 500 companies in that area. And actually 73 of those just in the automotive, the Smart Mobility are presenting here at CES. That's like, quite impressive number of Israeli companies. So as a government, we're trying to promote them all the way from, from basic research until the commercialization of of the technologies, but also take those innovations, the fruits that were created, and actually bring them to deployment in implementations.

 
Jamie Boone 

Lauren, I wanna, I want to go back to you. We talked a little bit about micro mobility. So I want to talk about the role of micro mobility in the future of transportation and approximately You know, jump in from your perspective of how you see this, and you mentioned intermodal, and how you see some of these different innovations coming together to really revolutionize the way that, you know, we we move from place to place. So talk a little bit about, you know, what we're seeing and micro mobility and what that role is. And then, you know, we can open up and expand from there. Absolutely.

 
Lauren Belive 

I started by talking about the car, the average American spends $9,000 a year on their car when it comes to, you know, insurance and parking and gas. And they only use it 5% of the life of the time, the car, the other 95% of the time, it's sitting part. It's a very inefficient system. When you think about much more multi mobility, it's really about consumer choice, right? If you are having the ability to walk out your door and look at an app lift app, for instance. You can then see okay, I have a scooter one block away. I have the orange line coming in five minutes, where I could call A shared ride. You know, this is a very basic idea. But then when you start looking at different case studies of where these rides are coming and going and in different, different communities, you look at underserved transportation deserts, people that don't have reliable transportation, people who may need to walk a mile to get to a bus stop, all of a sudden, can they take a bike to the bus stop? Or can they take a shared ride to the train station so they can have a more direct route to their job in the center of a city. I think that's really going to be causing more economic opportunities, more healthcare solutions, long term, lift is debuting a lot of interesting things around grocery access. That's very exciting, bringing people to grocery stores that live in transportation and food deserts. And also job access, looking for people to be able to get to job interviews and then get to their jobs. And it's it's I think it's just scratching the surface and we're really excited to see where we can go with this.

 
Dee Williams 

Let's go ahead. Oh, I would just say, you know, from our perspective, yeah, the things that we're looking at when it comes to micro mobility would be how, again, is it changing some of those jurisdictional boundaries? And what do we need to be looking at, I mean, this, this technology is outpacing all of us in terms of our different best practices and processes and procedures. So we need to, you know, see what's coming down the pike and also look at an in this area, there's a dearth of information or data that that we need to take into consideration. So that's one of the places that we're looking at, where we may be able to improve the data collection for some of these micro mobility like the scooters and other choices that our consumers are having. But at the same time, again, cross cross those modal boundaries. What are we seeing in terms of how is like transit right? airship being affected? or other forms of transportation? We also do want to look at the built environment and and what is the impact there? And what are the changes that may be needed going forward with infrastructure.

 
Jamie Boone 

So, a lot of you know, what we're seeing and what we're hearing and a couple of you've made this point is that we're in a time of real revolution and transportation, and whereas things might have been a little more separate and siloed in the past and how we think about regulating them and growing them. The challenge now really is how you think about it all holistically. You know, so and I'd love to hear you know, a little bit more about the efforts going on in Israel and what the government initiative on how we started to pull that together and be more cohesive and then other folks want to jump in?

 
Anat Bonshtien 

Well, the government's role is to enable it to enable things that will the public will benefit for and that's Why the Prime Minister himself eight years ago initiated this program, which actually when he realized that Smart Mobility is a matter of almost every ministry in the government of Israel, and that's why it has to be coordinated. So you have the Minister of transportation, setting the standards, and you have the Ministry of Energy, doing everything at around the energy for the vehicles, and the Ministry of innovation, which promotes innovation, but everything has to be coordinated and unified into actually, one day, two goals. It's creating innovation, making it a growth engine for Israel, but also enjoying the fruits of those innovation, deploying it in Israel. And what we have been doing now, for the last year is actually educating not just the public but more deceivers and want to spell to those end users that will actually be the ones to most benefit from those solutions, like the micro mobility, and those things are happening fast when you look at your back, there was almost no scooters in Tel Aviv, you know, your time, there's like four different companies working, all of Tel Aviv is full of scooters. And again, and you need to look at the, at the at the to maximize, you need to look at the benefits of it as a last mile solution, this is something great. And it has to be side by side with the regular transportation that we don't believe it takes people from the transportation system, but it actually gives people another choice.

 
Jamie Boone 

Let's talk more about that. I think you know, Aurora, you know, doing a lot of great work across the country and giving you opportunities and the future of self driving a lot of you know, the excitement is really on increasing opportunities from ability and filling you know, a lot of these gaps and same with with lift as well. So, you know, as you start to really think about these new opportunities and how you connect with new people, how, how can government How can you work with government to make that easier and make that helpful?

 
Gerado Interiano 

Think, look, government is a key partner to everything that we do. And they are allies. And we want to build those relationships to give you an idea in Pennsylvania. So we have offices in Pennsylvania, Bozeman, Montana, and San Francisco, and Palo Alto. In Pennsylvania, we were the first company to get our permit and to be authorized to be able to deploy our technology in the state. We have an excellent relationship at the state and local level, we've been working with federal government with nitsa with D o. t, that relationship has to be there and that transparency has to be there, right? We have to build that trust between government so the government can trust us and at the same time when we share information with government that we can also trust, the information that we're sharing and the confidentiality that we have. That's there, but to the comments that have been made on the panel, what excites us is it is that last mile, and it is, you know, how do we help a single mother with three kids who have to take six different bus routes to get to work and if we can provide an autonomy vehicle to shorten that route and give her time back at home with her children, or we can help that person that's disabled, who can't get to work. I mean, I was recently talking to a friend of mine, who was saying that their son solely relies on family and friends to get to work, he is fully able to have a job. But he has to have somebody take him and drop him off and pick him up every single day. This technology could revolutionize his life, on top of the safety components of saving people's lives, and you know, and from an efficiency perspective, giving people their time back, and you start to think about senior citizens and the impact that it has. We've had conversations with AARP. And what does it do to a senior citizen when you take away their keys, the mental health components that come along with that if we can tell a senior citizen, we're giving you your mobility back, we're giving you that freedom back. That's, that's life changing for them. And and I mentioned earlier, part of our mission is to do this broadly. And that's what that means for us. It means that we're going to have an impact on all of the Different ways. And it's not just the movement of people, it's also the movement of goods. We had a conversation with a state senator in Pennsylvania, who was explaining to us what this meant to the dairy industry. You know, if we can shorten the time that it takes to get a perishable product from point A to point B, you're all the sudden opening markets that were not accessible to them beforehand. And if it means that it took three days to get there, and now it takes 24 hours to get there, that changes that industry, and it gives them access to markets that they wouldn't have had beforehand. So the more that we can identify those examples, and we can work with government to communicate that, that that's what's going to continue to drive that conversation. One of my colleagues was recently at the AV summit in Florida, and hearing from your head of the Florida Highway Patrol, on the impact that this technology can have on the patrol the deaths that happen unfortunately, on roads, of law enforcement and construction workers. It's about having those conversations, but it's the convening power of government that a allows for those conversations to happen. So for us, it's important to be a part of that conversation and to have those doors open so we can continue to talk about it.

 
Jamie Boone 

Senator, I want to take it over to you now, you've obviously had a huge role in AB policy early on Florida has been, you know, one of the earliest states to be really proactive. You know, why has sort of been so productive? What's, you know, talk a lot about the benefits,

 
Jeff Brandes 

right? So I wish there was some deep reason that we started working on self driving cars. It was really, I think the the single best source of all knowledge for young legislators are TED Talks. And so back in 2010, I watched the bathroom through TED Talks. I'm sure many of you have seen that. And that's sparked my drive. I had been an army officer before for that and I spent 2003 2004 in Iraq with 100. And first as a transportation officer, and recognize pretty quickly that would have made my experience much better in the convoys had I not had to be in them. And, and so I immediately was gravitated towards that. I idea. But and and began to work on the self driving car technology and brought Google in early on as they were the only player back in 2010 or 11. And so was able to build relationships early on. And we've seen the fruit of that relationship grow over the last few years. But I think it's important to kind of go back to something Warren really started with was Think about all of the things the states have had to deal with in the last just decade. Right? Any one of them would be revolutionary, to the transportation space, whether it's driverless, whether it's micro mobility, whether it's electrification, where there's the shared economy, the fact that all of those things are are simultaneously happening at the state level and and state and national level, really, for elected officials is just trying to play catch up. But yet, how do you structure yourself some states say no, until we tell you yes, some states say yes until we tell you know, and so we have this different we have this different thoughts. process going on amongst the states. But I think, as I tried to counsel states and cities, I really liken this to this, the state is really kind of a car driving in the fog right now, we really don't know what's on the road ahead. And so when you drive in the fog, you tend to slow down, you tend to be very aware of what's going on around you. And what we're really doing there is you're maximizing your options. And so I think states need to be focused on ideas that maximize our options for the future right now.

 
Anat Bonshtien 

I want to add something to that. And also what was mentioning before about the conversation, the dialogue with the government, which is very important, because the I mean, the private sector is going really fast here. And for us as a government, it's it we need to keep in the pace of learning those technologies and what's good and what and, and so our way of testing that or learning from that is through a pilot and demonstration program which actually allows not only this gives the company that The ability to showcase its technology and I'm not talking about small pilots but more of a big pilots a couple of vehicles on the road already. It's so it helps the company showcase its technology. But it was even more important. It's it lets us as a government, as a regulator, learn the technology and see what exactly is is happening and what regulation is needed. So we have the waivers for all that period, because there is no regulation for certain things. And we don't want to say okay, as long as there's no regulation, we're not going to be, we're not gonna let it happen. No, we want to learn from those new technologies, how, again, we can benefit from them.

 
Jeff Brandes 

I think we have to have a discussion with our cities, and frankly, the state about what we should be presenting to the state level and what we should be leaving the local level to decide. Now, some cities will say leave everything to us. That doesn't really work in the world of Uber and Lyft. Where you know, if you have 120 million tourists and you're trying to get somebody from one city to the other, and they have different rules or different insurance requirements, so clearly those needs, these things need to be premium. To the state. But maybe in scooters, we take a very different approach. And so I think we need to be very thoughtful about what ultimately is preempted. I think 5g is probably something you're going to have to preempt to the state in order to make sure you have coverage everywhere. Things like abs, I think you can be a little bit more soft touch on. But I think we have to be very thoughtful as as we're moving forward about preemptions. And I would say that for the national level as well.

 
Jamie Boone 

Dee, I'm going to move over to you and talk a little bit more about the efforts of the IoT. And it's a, you know, in, in stepping up and making sure that you know, we're you're pushing out guidelines, the industry and helping to make sure you're ensuring safety, because at the end of the day, that's what especially on the self driving side, that's what this is all about. This is what this is for.

 
Dee Williams 

Yeah, yeah. So again, safety is our number one priority. I mean, we recognize the mean, we're losing, as you had mentioned 40,000 lives a year. So I mean, what we're working on, I mean, really our one of our main strategies is stick with engagement. So at every aspect we're seeking, and you'll, you'll see many notices out there from not just our agency, but the department where we're looking for feedback, we're looking for input. And that includes, you know, some of the recent ones where we're seeing some of these innovative interior and exterior designs. But also, what do we need to do with our test procedures to allow where they can show compliance? Are there? Are there translation options or alternative ways to comply? So these are things we're looking at along with in the research area. So we have several things going on, whether it be looking at various metrics and methods, so track testing simulation on road, and also, what metrics should we come up with? I mean, you had mentioned about, you know, how safe is safe enough? I mean, this is a question we asked herself all the time. So under metrics, I mean, we ourselves, we're looking at industry efforts. Better out there that are going on. And in that would include like Ul 4600, or 51st. For automated vehicles, these are all things we're assessing. But first and foremost, I mean, we need input from all of you and everyone here at this conference and otherwise, to better inform the directions that things need to go. And just the thought, the thought the innovative designs that maybe we haven't even realized or are seeing yet, but with all those, I mean, we recognize as the government, we need that sound science, data and engineering. So we are looking at modernizing and streamlining our standards. But we do need that sound science data engineering.

 
Jamie Boone 

So we've talked a good bit about the roles of federal government and state government and some of the international level. One thing I want to shift to a little bit more is, cities and the role of cities can play in integrating all of these different technologies. Lauren lift is partnering with the City of Los Angeles, and with several other tech companies and a public private Alliance, called La urban movement labs. Tell us a little bit more about that. What are the goals of that? And what do you expect to learn?

 
Lauren Belive 

Well, LA is probably the most traffic clubs city in our country. And I really need to hand it to Mayor Garcetti for having an eye on the prize and the future for this. This is a public private partnership. Whereas the mayor's office the LA d o t, the LA airports, the la porta for the coming together with companies like Lyft waymo, Avis budget group and Verizon. And we have the opportunity to diversify and look through the different communities of LA and pilot our programs, from autonomous vehicle technology, to the multimode mobility that we're working on, and really try to show to showcase la as the future leader of what a utopian transportation society could look like. And it's something that could be the model for other cities, not just domestically but globally as well. And we're really at the tip of the spear with this. This is the launch of this partnership. But I think the opportunities are limitless. And as we're heading toward the 2028 Olympics in LA, I'm just I'm so excited to see what sort of pilots and innovation can come from this.

 
Jamie Boone 

All right, what about from a risk perspective? You've got a couple different cities you're really active in? Obviously, Pittsburgh was your hometown, where you started talking about how you've worked with with those local governments.

 
Gerado Interiano 

Yeah, I mean, you know, the reality is the front lines are going to be your mayors and your city council members, when when a constituent or when somebody has a problem with what we're doing. They're going to call those offices. So one of the things that we have as a policy in our team is no surprises. And we want to be as transparent as possible with all levels of government, including cities so that if a constituent or a resident that city calls them and says hey, I saw x self driving car on the street, I have some questions. They should already have those answers, like the last thing that I want is For DS office to call me and say, Hey, we just got a phone call about you guys doing x y&z and she has, and we and she had no idea, right? So like our job as a team, as a Government Relations team is to work with government to understand this is what we're doing. This is where we're going. And these are the relationships that we have in place. One example on just how different and how these rules change. Now, this is probably more statewide than it is local. But for example, how do you use a bike lane that changes from state to state so for example, in some states, you're required to go into the bike lane to make a right hand turn, and other states you're outlawed from using the bike lane, and you have to go around it to make that right hand turn. So one of the things that our teams is spending time on is working with cities and states to figure out how can we get them to work together? And how can we increase that collaboration to build more clarity for us, for drivers for pedestrians, for bicyclists, so that we can have a better understanding of why is it that we should use this bike lane to make a right hand turn or why not? Because otherwise, those are Engineering resources that all of our companies are using to try to determine those answers, when in reality, there might be a reason why we should use that bike lane or should not. But I think getting cities and states to work together and collaborate, to clarify and to bring more transparency to that I think it's something that would be very beneficial. And I think there's a role for all of us to play in that in that conversation.

 
Jamie Boone 

And that, let's think let's broaden back out a little bit more to the international level and talk about how, how your office is working with in Israel with other partners. I think, you know, one of the challenges that we've seen in the US has been a little bit of a patchwork problem of different states have different different, you know, stages of development. Are you seeing that from your perspective and and how can you help to alleviate that?

 
Anat Bonshtien 

Well, it is really it's, it's less of a mess. I say that on governments and ministries. So and again, the thinking of putting this initiative Within the promises office was exactly that to coordinate all of the ministries together. Now, we have created for the last seven years, that ecosystem of innovation and things and the research centers and academies involved and everyone and the different programs and mechanism to support that. But and today, and then that's also as a going back to what you mentioned about the cities is we see that gap again, that's a major gap between existing technologies in and and the needs of the city, the challenges of the city. And and last year, we thought, why is it happening? Why I mean, there's innovation, there's the need, there's the challenges, why not, you know, just bridge that gap. But then we understood that we have to create those champions those quarterbacks within them when spells in risinger cities and sit with them and by the way, each for each city. It's something totally different. It's different challenges. Sit with them understand what are their challenges. What opportunities can they also benefit for and do that like matchmaking per city and and it's, again, Israel a small state yet a lot of cities and each city is quite different. But that's the mechanism that you have to create. You have to create those champions, those quarterbacks within the municipalities, have them all back, engage the whole city, the homeownership ality around what challenges there is, and what opportunities and what innovation and just matchmake that,

 
Jeff Brandes 

and I'll jump in there a little bit, you said that you saw this kind of challenge of the patchwork, I actually think it's a competency to have a patchwork. Because let's just take the example of self driving cars. If you were in California, and you wanted to charge for a ride today that's prohibited by the state. That's not prohibited by most states. And so I think it's exciting that we have this patchwork of legislation now. what we'll see is the best practices ultimately will rise to the top I think that's what we want to occur. But I think we're we're facing a patchwork of nations, we should we're facing a patchwork of state. And we should embrace that. That difference. We say that the states are really the laboratories of democracy. That's where the innovation occurs. And that's where the innovation is occurring in micro mobility. It's where it's occurring in autonomy. And it's where it's where it's where it's occurring in electrification. And we're excited about that. The competence the and what's driving this forward and working with great partners.

 
Dee Williams 

And if I could jump into so on the international front, I would just say for the US, I mean, we want to maintain that global leadership in this area. So I mean, we have worked with the world forum forum for harmonization of vehicle regulations, or what we call wp 29. And last last year, you know, the contracting parties they did actually adopt a foundational document and that foundational document was based off of What the IoT and Nicole are both our two point O and our three point O best practices. So we did work that with China, Japan, and also the European Union to get that document adopted. And that's that's to advance what we're seeing with everyone on on automated vehicles.

 
Anat Bonshtien 

I want to add something else about looking at US cities for US states from from, from my perspective. So there is a lot of innovation and you even the three of you described different activities that are going on in Florida in LA, San Francisco, whatever, but I just learned this term a couple of days ago, the flyover states anyway, so I was sitting with a couple of people from DLT a couple of times and they're always saying that there's the same problems that that LA and San Francisco have also other cities across the US and they are less there's there's there's less innovation coming inside and i think that's that's that, that should that should be something that should they should change because there's a lot of there's a big market out there that needs that innovation. And not only the on the fly to states

 
Lauren Belive 

and learn, I know that that something that is very important to lift as making sure your region all of those customers

 
Lauren Belive 

will absolutely lift is not only in all 50 states, but it's not just a deep urban product we're looking at how do we reach suburban and urban environments as well? And how do we become the best transportation in the world for for everyone and and we're at the tip of the iceberg, as I said, and it's going to be exciting how we continue to democratize the technology. And just a note on that as well. With lift we have a two prong approach when we approach autonomous vehicles. We have our level five, autonomous technology and house we're developing the software, but we also have our open platform network. And that's going to be a really exciting opportunity for for everyone here to actually have that first consumer touch with the technology to be able to utilize autonomous vehicles on a lift platform and to be able to really feel comfortable and understand how the technology works. So we're working with partners across the board on that and as that develops, it's going to be something that that everyone can try and be able to to enjoy.

 
Jamie Boone 

Ryder when we when we started and you were listing off some of the places where was active. And you mentioned Bozeman, and I did not I actually did not know that before. So tell us a little bit why Bozeman.

 
Gerado Interiano 

Yeah, so Bozeman is actually really cool story. It was our one of our acquisitions in 2019. Probably one of the things that we're the most proud of is we acquired a state of the art LIDAR company that is based in Bozeman. So it turns out there's a photonics cluster in Bozeman, Montana and we are proud to have kept that office there. We have about I want to say around 70 employees that are in Bozeman, and the continues to be part of the expansion that we have in the team and excited to be incorporating this new LIDAR technology into our vehicles.

 
Jamie Boone 

dnl d ot A while ago announced, you know that we were looking at some public private partnerships and IPP. He talked about that a little bit.

 
Dee Williams 

Yeah. So again, one of the things that we're constantly looking for is how we can build those partnerships. I mean, we've had earlier this year, we announced some pilots that we're doing both so this goes on the state and local government front, but also then, of course, you know, with the companies themselves, so we don't have too much just jet from that. I'd say stay tuned. Also, you're going to hear from Secretary Chow tomorrow with some other efforts that we have, that we're going to be going forward with and some possible announced. So I'd say if you can join for that. It'll be pretty exciting.

 
Jamie Boone 

And Central Florida, obviously a big state, you know, not in Certainly not fires ever state, but still you have a lot of rural areas and different communities that you're trying to reach and, you know, different age groups that react to technology differently. Give us a perspective on that.

 
Jeff Brandes 

Yeah. So I think, as we think about as we think about the big challenges of floor and the problems that we're trying to solve, when you're going out 1000 people a day, transportation and affordable housing become some of the most the probably the two largest challenges that every city in the state of Florida is facing. And I think the great thing about the conversation shifting to mobility is it allows our cities to reset. Just like as we think about kind of how we moved away from the horse and buggy to the automobile and that forced the reset of cities. I think the shape reshaping of mobility will force a reset of cities. And in some places that may be conversations with city officials that are are saying, well maybe we don't need two parking spots per apartment anymore. Maybe we can do one or maybe we can do none for downtown. Core parking because there's other shared options available. I think that allows us to reimagine development. It allows us to reimagine buildings. Today, the lobby of a building is generally the place you go from the parking garage to the elevator. But tomorrow in a world of a V's the lobby becomes a transportation hub. It becomes the you know, the concourse, if you will, for dispatching these trips. And so I think it allows us to reimagine office buildings, apartments, and ultimately our city horse.

 
Jamie Boone 

With that, we have about 15 minutes left, I want to give the audience a chance to ask some questions. So there is a microphone in the middle somewhere. So if you are, if you have a question, and we're just bringing it over now, go to the microphone just announced. Just give us your name and your affiliation and please keep it to a short question. actually ask a question please. And if you want to direct it to anybody, just let us know. We might need help with turning the mic on. There we go.

 
Speaker 

Good morning, inertia syntek in Paris on mobility. I remember last year exactly here. Mobileye made a very impressive presentation. And he said that in order to go to drive or less, the Department of Transportation have to answer 120 question because the computer ask but that's not precise enough. And he said that time the the only government we accept the challenge was these two answers these hundred and 20 question. So I would like to have a status report. And when do you expect that movie live will haul out? driverless fleet We the open source software, which is compatible with the answer to those hundred and 20 question.

 
Jamie Boone 

So go ahead.

 
Anat Bonshtien 

So a either if it's for mobile IO for any other company that is interested, we are now actually putting in the regulation for autonomous vehicles taking into consideration. Mobile I of course is one of the companies attending in their, their input and their their status. But we do hope that by the end of 2020, we will have all the regen, maybe even before we'll have all the regulations set in place so that mobile I like companies could operate at least in the first in public transportation not necessarily a private vehicles.

 
Speaker 

Hi, I'm Stacey. Big fan. autonomous, but I'm even a bigger fan of bikes. were burning the planet. So if you could perhaps say what your thoughts are on electric bikes, Bike Share getting them to the masses. I'd love it. Martin saw you

 
Lauren Belive 

earlier in 2019 lifts, acquired motivate, which is the largest doct bike share in the country. So if you have a docked brand in your city or town that's that's actually lift. And for us while we were not at electric bikes yet, it's something that we are considering. And I think as much as we can, every single ride that we do is is offset 100% is carbon neutral. And I think looking at bikes, scooters, electric bikes, that's something that will just continue to fuel our passion. To ensure that where we're doing our part,

 
Jeff Brandes 

and I think I think as we speak a little bit about what we're really talking about decoupling the car and how we you know, it's kind of crazy that you know, if you want to order a burrito on on one of the doordash platforms, it comes to you in a 5000 pound car. Right? And so as we think about bikes going forward, and it's really everything below the car, it's kind of horse did use what is it 5000 or 500 kilogram discussion about everything in that micro mobility space and so it's, it is not just bikes, but it's scooters, it's things you know, Rebel just deployed 750 scooters in downtown Miami, which is an electric swappable bike, swappable scooter platform and not like a traditional scooter but more like a sit on riding scooter. And so I think it's it's everything in that space is evolving and we're going to see what works and what doesn't pretty quickly. As, as the the lifecycle of micro mobility devices are much more akin to a fruit fly than a human. So we're, I think the great thing is we're able to watch this evolution occur at a much faster pace. And cities are going to be able to experiment at a much quicker pace with things like ebikes and scooters.

 
Speaker 

Hey, I'm Tom from Nicola Motor Company. Just curious about your thoughts on autonomous and electrified vehicles moving through all three levels, city, state and federal on set routes in between states. So we didn't talk about commercial vehicles very much. So just curious your thoughts on that sort of transportation.

 
Jamie Boone 

Any thoughts on commercial trucking and use electrification as well? How any company is going to integrating any of that into your plans.

 
Lauren Belive 

Let's just Lyft is just not partaking on the track. Or delivery side. But I will say in terms of government regulations, I think regulations is one of lifts favorite words. And as we're going toward autonomous vehicles, having very clear guidelines on on how we can operate both the federal and then at the state level will be very helpful as we're deploying and having increased awareness on our testing limitations will be extremely helpful so we can continue to enhance that safety through our tests.

 
Gerado Interiano 

I think from our perspective, you know, as I mentioned earlier, we we are certainly thinking about trucking already. And it's something that's important to you. It's a huge market, and it's a huge opportunity. I also think, you know, coming back to that collaboration perspective, getting states to work together. So for example, getting states that have those borders next to one another to figure out how is it that they create the right program, the right regulations to be able to cross state lines easily while working with the federal government as well? I think that's going to be really important.

 
Jeff Brandes 

I think you're going to see autonomy in trucking. First, I think that's one of the trends that's beginning to emerge, at least in my perspective, watching the industry. They don't have to deal with the complicated domains of operating in cities. And so I think you're going to see the business case for autonomous vehicles. Obviously, there's a huge truck driving shortage in this country and around the world. And so I think you're going to see it drive there first. And I think you're going to see these routes largely be focused on the southern states because it doesn't snow. And so I think, you know, AV companies are looking for ways to cheat hard problems wherever they can, and not operating in snow and a trucking fleet seems to be the easiest way to an operating and southern state seems to be the easiest way to cheat around that, that that, that problem, but I think you're going to see partnerships from Texas to Florida really begin to develop amongst the southern states with autonomous trucking, but I also think, you know, trucking is also one of the more challenging areas at the federal level because of the truckers union, and the pushback on jobs you're going to see at the at the federal level with congressmen and their US senators hearing from from the trucking unions about jobs.

 
Dee Williams 

So I'd say at the federal level for us, I mean, we are looking at the safe design and performance aspects and that that doesn't matter what type of vehicle it is we are not separating on now. So that is something we're taking the consideration and conducting research and also working with, as I mentioned earlier, you know, these are crossing our modal jurisdictions. So we do work very closely with our sister agency, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, they they oversee more of the operational aspects, but ours is again the safe design and the performance aspects of the vehicle and all those are being taken into consideration.

 
Anat Bonshtien 

I think that that aside from the trucking the autonomous we're most likely at least from Israel. Answer first of all the on demand shuttles which also has a greater impact on the whole mobility. And and in Israel. There's no snow. So it's also

 
Speaker 

Hello, my name is Aaron. So I just have a question that kind of pieces everything together that you guys have been presenting, imagining that Lyft has their own fleet of self driving vehicles and that they allow the use of other vehicles such as ones that would use auroras technology, and with states like Florida that are like, Yes, let's do this. I'm just wondering, you know, and with the D o. t, having this harmonized approach to like, if you make a vehicle, it can work in the United States, and it can also work in Israel if it you know, in in Europe and in other places, across China across the world. I mean, that's, that's crazy that that could all be harmonized with all of this on the table. I was wondering if each of you could say how many years you think it is before. Maybe 50% of the vehicles on the road are not you Using a driver, not like Lane Keeping type stuff, but really are truly driverless, level four, level five.

 
Lauren Belive 

I don't think I can give you a year timeline right now. But I think you hit the nail on the head. We're at the start of this industry where you're going to have and lift is amplifying this with all of our partners, but you're going to have a Ford car with lift technology operating on a waymo platform, or you can driving right next to Toyota car with waymo technology operating on a lift platform. And these kind of hybrid partnerships are really going to start excelling how the industry is being launched. And and it will be interesting to see I feel right, like right now it's a little bit of a race to the moon. So I can't give you the date. But let me say before this decade is over. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. So it's gonna be great. We're all john f kennedy up here.

 
Gerado Interiano 

So look, I this this question, probably What comes up more than anything else? Right, like, when is it? What is the timeline? When can I buy one? And there's a couple, there's a couple of things that are built into that question. One is when folks asked like, when can I get a car? It may be that you that any single individual never needs to have their own self driving car. Right. So like, we need to break down. What are the assumptions of that question? The way that we focus on that question is, because we are focused so much on safety, because we are so focused on saving people's lives. We we do not feel like we're in a position to put a timeline on when this technology is going to be there. Because as D and I have both mentioned, we need to understand when is it safer than a human driver? With that said, what I will do is, I will quote our CEO, has said that in the next five or 10 years, you're going to start to see more and more pilots and it's going to be larger and larger scale pilots. It may be that it's trucking, it may be that it's movement of people, so you're going to start to see that more and more, but what you know, try to answer when it's 50%. I don't think that any of us would be able to do that on the stage. I wholeheartedly

 
 

agree and nobody's gonna hold you to the number. With it being live streaming. I

 
Dee Williams 

know, and what I would know is we need to be very careful with that. I mean, this is very complex technologies. And even today, I mean, we're seeing, you know, the lower levels, that the advanced driver assistance systems are being rolled out. And we need to set realistic expectations for the consumers, we need to build their public trust and confidence. Because if not, you know, they, they need to be aware of the limitations and capabilities. That way we don't see abuse or misuse. Putting a number on it, I mean, we some companies have and they already have come back to us and said, Nope, we need to push that a little bit further out. We, you know, there's it's very complex and they realized some stuff themselves and in. I'm not in a position to put a number on it.

 
Jeff Brandes 

I'll give you a number Look, I think if you're thinking about L, two cars, I would say 2035. You'll see every car half half car sold in 2030 2035 timeframe will have LTE technologies you were talking about before. I think it's probably 2014 to 2015. And that in that timeframe, I think it's just farther out. In that is and i think i think there is some thought that you know, not everybody's going to own a car. Let me tell you in Florida, we have hurricanes every now and then. And nobody's going to trust a pocket lift to get you out of town. They're going to want their own personally own vehicle, and anybody has a family of four kids. They're not going to, you know, I think that that's going to be a big transition for parents as well. And so I think, though, that you're you're we're going to want that functionality to have autonomy in the vehicle itself, whether but I think it will will will see some, some version of L2 L4 in in those vehicles and that people want to buy and own those those vehicles as well. But I think actually The biggest shift you're going to see over the next decade is the shift to electrification. And I think that's something we really haven't touched on that much. But But I think we've seen even if you'd come to CES two or three years ago, you know, it seemed like we were one line of code away. It was the big push, there was the everybody was hoping for the Eureka moment. And I think we've all kind of sobered up and recognize that the timeframes are further off. And, and that we need to be we need to be focusing on a variety of different technologies right now just not focused on on one so much. But thinking that, but thinking that electrification really seems to be where the major OEMs are shifting towards, and something that states like Florida need to be getting our arms around, as we think about, about the challenges of shifting a fleet that is probably less than 1%, electric, to maybe 10% Electric by 2030. So I think that's, you know, for states like ours, that's what we're working on and thinking about the challenges and complexities of evacuating a million people when you have a hurricane like Irma coming through the state and thinking about right now 10% of the vehicles are electric, how do we charge those? But we're thinking about those problems today. But I think it's important that state that we think about the variety of challenges, not just focus on autonomy.

 
Anat Bonshtien 

We don't ask ourselves when we're going to see 50% of the vehicles, as autonomous vehicles. We ask ourselves, when are we going to see 50% vehicles list on the road? I think that's the right question. To address. Thank you.

 
Jamie Boone 

Okay, great. And last question.

 
Speaker 

Thank you. Hi, I'm Jeff. I'm from Atlanta, Georgia. And I wanted to come back to electrification. Thank you, Senator Brandon from right racing that I want to give a shout out to lift and ask you to maybe expand on you probably know where I'm going. There's a public private partnership with Cox enterprise and lift in metro Atlanta, where the you're using a center to help the underprivileged manage their lives by having access to electric boats. I heard the utilization is about 80%. I want to find out from you, Lorna, that scalable. And I want to raise the question to the broader panel. How do we help address these social inequalities to electrification, using our shared transportation modalities, and where there's policy needs. I'll give a shout out to our senator thanks to FPL for finally launching a great RFP on electrification Florida is doing a good job. But I wanted to get a sense of public private partnerships to help address social inequality through electrification. It's a lot there, but I see some good things happen.

 
Lauren Belive 

Thank you very much, and I hope it's scalable. You know, as I mentioned before, 100% of our rides are carbon neutral and lift at lift, we dream about an electric future. One day, hopefully there's 100% ABV fleets. And so this is something we're focused on its core to both of our co founders principles, and something we'd like to see mimicked across the country.

 
Jamie Boone 

We are out of time. So thank you all for being here. Thank you to our panelists this great conversation

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