Jean Foster 

Good afternoon, everybody and welcome to Las Vegas. Welcome to ces 2020. And welcome to the first session in our cmo insights conference. This is a program for CMOS by CMOS. My name is Jean Foster. I'm the Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications here at CTA. We're the organization that puts on this little global part to the is CES. We've got a great program for you this afternoon. I'm going to be kicking off with some amazing panelists for our first session, which is the sea in the CMO focusing on the the C suite 2pm. We're going to have one of our media partners seen it are going to be hosting a really great panel focusing on the digital health tech revolution. For those of you who've been focusing on the health space is probably one of the fastest growing sectors of the text technology sector is a key part of the CES program. And if you're in healthcare, I would encourage you to go to the sands over the next four days, see our health and wellness section and also check out the conference program over there which is focused on digital health. And then we wrap up today's session with a panel at 3pm. on diversity, we're going to have Shelley's Alice, who's the the founder and CEO of the female quotient, the female quotient. Our CES is official equality partner for ces 2020. And Shelley is also going to have a great panel of speakers on stage for some big brands who are going to focus on the best practices for driving diversity in organizations. so busy afternoon, hopefully you'll be able to stay for the entire session. But first of all, I want to kick off with our panel and welcome some great CMOS to the stage. First of all, please join me in on stage Jennifer Berman general is the CEO of insider Diana O'Brian. Diana is a global CMO of Deloitte. And finally, Deborah, while Deborah is the global CMO of GM General Motors. Jennifer's got her fan club here. Thank you, our panelists, I get the best names on stage here with me. So we're here to talk about the C in CMO. And, and really, this is a this is a group of, you know, females, CMOS, but really CMOS, more importantly here focused on driving the business agenda of their organizations. And that's really what we want to focus on. You know, the role that the CMO pulling in their organization and in the C suite. So that's going to be the focus of today's organization, we're going to be talking about growth, we're going to be talking about disruption. And we're going to be talking about the role that marketing can and should play in that. So before you before we go into the details, I would just love you ladies, just to do a quick introduction. Ryan, tell us a little bit about you a bit about your role. But more importantly, what was your journey to the C suite? How did you get there?

 
Jenifer Berman 

We'll start off with you, Jen. Right. Well, first, thank you for having me. Thank you to my co panelists for joining and Frankie for all of you for coming out early. Like being here. The early bird catches the worm. So I have been an insider for three years I am the first cmo. We can talk a little bit about that because it's an interesting we have not it's been, for me, it's very different joining an organization that is a growth organization that is more of an adolescent organization as opposed to working for a legacy brand. I've worked for lots of legacy brands. And so you're a bit like me Holding the brand on your back when you're a CMO at a place like National Geographic where I was for many years, but I started actually, my career started out as an editor. So I was on the other side, but I spent most of my career working in media. So storytelling is kind of always been at my core. The difference in terms of my role at insider is that not only do I run the marketing side of the organization, but I also run the sale, so did the organization. So some of what you talked about in terms of how you define yourself, I would sort of say more of being a growth officer more than anything, because I actually oversee sort of, you know, not only customer sort of messaging, but also acquisition as well. So for me, we can, you know, sort of talk a little bit about it, but I think what I've done it inside are really has been about really having to create a brand, which is something that's very different. And so it's really about trying to shape an organization additive as it evolves for the future.

 
Jean Foster 

And Diana, I've heard you tell the story before we have probably a non traditional path to the CMO role.

 
Diana O'Brien 

I do. I started at Deloitte, some 35 years ago and started as a consultant Life Sciences and healthcare lead the life sciences portfolio for a little while. So I'll be excited to see what's in the health and wellbeing area. But then I had a pivotal moment I was asked to take on the responsibility for Deloitte university to get it built and open it and run it. And it was just it changed everything in the way that I thought about what I did. It wanted, I always knew that it was about acquiring customers, but I didn't really understand that it was about the experience that you needed to create to really engender long term loyalty. We did that for our people. And then it was that that led to the opportunity for me to take on what we called market development. It was sales, marketing, communications policy, it was everything that you need to really drive growth in the business. We didn't call it the CMO then because we didn't even use the title But two years into it, we established the title, I still had a chance to sit at the executive level and influence them, but I didn't have the C in the title. So it was something that I worked towards influencing my peer group that I that I earned.

 
Jean Foster 

If you've never had the chance to go to the Deloitte university, I would encourage you to do that. It is spectacular. Absolutely amazing place.

 
Diana O'Brien 

Thanks.

 
Jean Foster 

Deborah, tell us a little bit about your journey.

 
Deborah Wahl 

 I'm going to build on your idea. It's all about the experience. So I think I've had a long and winding road. I love and have always followed the diversity of experiences. So I've worked in five industries. I've lived on three continents worked in three different languages, and all of it just trying to figure out how to create value in this human life that we live. And then at one point in time, I sort of said, where next and I'm from Detroit, originally Motor City. Love it there. And looking at all the regeneration that's going on. It said, You know what, I want to go back to my roots. Because after all that journeying, it seems like you want to go back to the place you started. So I did that. And then the second part was like you kind of think about it's in the Midwest, and I've come to this new recognition that all good things come from the middle. So there's so much going on there. Exactly. So the Midwest is great. I'm back with my family in the middle of that, well, that's sort of good, you know, most of the part and and then was incredibly inspired by the mission of General Motors and what Mary Barra said, who's an amazing CEO, inspirational leader, and she said, you know, we want to take on challenges and have a mission to sort of improve on all the unintended consequences of what mobility has created. So we want to do our part in creating a world of zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion and That, to me was one of the most inspiring things. So combine that with what the Midwest is doing, rejuvenating, that's sort of how I ended up on this path and always inspired by just how do we relate together as humans? And what do we do? And how do we create value?

 
Jean Foster 

Great. So So let's talk a little bit more about the the C, part of the of the CMO. What is what does it mean for you? What part of that? What are you doing at the C suite? And terms of, you know, the marketing and the role that marketing plays on the C suite? So, Diana, do you want to kick us off? Sure.

 
Diana O'Brien 

Well, because I didn't have it, I would tell you that it doesn't have to do with the idea of Chief, it has to do with the idea that you are a member of a team that has to see themselves as responsible for everything in the business. So it isn't about going in and just talking about marketing or even just sharing the customer and insights about the customer. That's insufficient. You have to be able to Connect what you're talking about the insights you have with the issues that the CFO has and the risk officer has and that the CEO wants to accomplish. So it isn't enough to it isn't about the chief, it's about being a collaborator. It's about being sure you've got to cover your own issues. But you need to contribute to the rest of the team and bring insight and value to them in ways that at least as coming up, I didn't think it worked quite that way. I thought it was a bit more of, I'd operate my silo, I bring the value that you needed, and all would be well good. And it just doesn't work that way. And so you have to feel responsible for everything. You are part of an elite team driving that business.

 
Jenifer Berman 

I would agree. I would agree with you in terms of the role about how the well the CMO and sort of marketing functionality about bringing it together and breaking down the silos. I think what was the interesting thing for me is when I started at Insider, which was three years ago, again, we didn't have a marketer. And we had grown incredibly quickly because we were siloed. And so we had hyper focus on various business units. But it allowed us to really aggressively move very quickly. I mean, we are now the third largest general news brand in the US. And you don't do that by you do that just by really, really focusing on a specific things. But what happens with that is that we didn't have a mission. We didn't have various parts of the organization did not know what the other side of the organization was doing. So all the CFO sat in the middle product was over here, editorial was over here, there was no Northstar that was sort of guiding what we did and nor was there something that was sort of knitting together and sort of bringing those down. And I think some of what was interesting is when we went through the process and the strategy process of building the brand, it was almost not only as much about educating our external audiences, but it was that educating our external audiences and and really about sort of driving that unity and continuity internally.

 
Deborah Wahl 

Totally, really, I think that is the best inside of all because you get to like looking building your career, all these years, everything. Finally, I'll get to Be the chief. And it's completely the opposite. It is all about, I said to myself the other day, I'm spending more time on the phone and actually talking to people than doing these other things that I thought was what leadership was all about. And it's changed. And I also love your point about it's, I'm sort of renamed it, it is not chief marketing officer. It's contributing Marketing Officer because it's all about the growth. But not only that, it's inspiring the disruption, inspiring the change, inspiring the pace, and all that to create a lot more value. So I think it's a really interesting time, because we've all heard so many of the articles about the CMO, this or that you see companies put them in place and don't have them. But this idea of this organizing principle, we all we need that so much everyone needs that, and an organization acts so much better when they have it. What's so interesting to me about this too, is that the so many, I think CMOS or senior marketing people that don't necessarily have as much confidence in themselves to do it, but that executive team potential Clearly the CEO, we just finished some research recently that said that the CEO had more confidence in the CMO, because of some of those things because they could connect the dots and create, break down some of the silos. And I think that's what's interesting about where this role is go. Yeah.

 
Jenifer Berman 

Well, it's an interesting, there's so much talk about how we die that the CMO and the CTO and those and I and while that's true, I think there was certainly a question for anyone who goes to an A, there's a push more about finding the marketers, the chief growth officer. And that's where the sales functionality comes in. Because it is about ultimately driving business because you are at the core of that, and you have a much broader umbrella perspective than anyone else on your team, with the exception perhaps of your CEO and your CFO who's gonna seize it all. Although we could do get to add a little more fun to it. Yeah.

 
Deborah Wahl 

Creativity and that cool connection, the spark, which I think is what's missing in a lot of the other disciplines. I mean, you know, not to say no one can do that. But I think that's the fun part. This part of our role, which makes it so great and so different than anyone elses,

 
Diana O'Brien 

this part comes from the customer. And that's what we own. And that's why I just think we shouldn't see that. Because having that insight, and really understanding what the customer needs, it's not about what you do, right? It's about

 
Deborah Wahl 

because that'll change the growth exactly, um, and everything. So that and that, of course, is the most inspiring, like, that's what I stay up every night thinking about, like, how are we going to find something new and cool that will really find a need and solve it and do something in a neat way.

 
Jean Foster 

What's interesting here is the language that each of you using, you know, it's not land me to that my younger marketing sales would have used you know, when we talk about all the creative stuff and little stuff, you're really talking business, you know, and this is something I encourage my team to do is don't come in and tell me about the activity. Tell me about the impact you're having on the business but that means it's a different you got to be talking business language, you got to be talking the CFOs language. I mean, how how do you You train and coach your team members to behave and to get to that that level so that they are talking much more broadly about business and not just about the coolest campaign that they're running.

 
Jenifer Berman 

I mean, in some ways for us, I don't think it's about retraining. I think that performance has been, as I know, as a 12 year old organization performance and data has been at the core of what we've done from the beginning. And so everyone from our, from our writers who understand, they might think that that's a great story. But in fact, the data will tell you that it may be that idea was maybe not as great as you thought it was, because nobody actually read it. And so, you know, we measure everything that we do we measure everybody, I mean, down to the people on my marketing staff, they sort of measure, they know, you know, what their hit rate is and what their win rate is on various different sort of activities as well. And so I think when you when you build that into the DNA of your organization from the get go, you don't have to train people and I think that part of at least for us, that's about the iteration. There's lots of talk about business disruption and how do you retrain staff? That is something I have had to deal with, because we're not a legacy organization kind of retraining or reworking kind of old habits and having to kind of retrofit the bad habits for this new world. That is just sort of part of who we are from the beginning. But I think you have to be hyper focused on performance across every part of the organization. When people come in, and an interview with us, we tell that to them, we say, you know, especially I know, our editor in chief says that, like you have to be prepared to be measured. And if you aren't comfortable with that, then this is not the right place for you. And that's absolutely.

 
Jean Foster 

So on a on a similar vein, you know, we you genuinely touched on it there. I feel as if we've been having this conversation for a number of years, you know, but like the CMO role and, you know, before it was, you know, the conversation was all about, it's the shortest tenure rule in the C suite, you know, like, you know, we've seen the stats, and then more recently is, will the CMO role still exist? You know, is it now chief revenue officer, etc. But, but when you think about it is still still a relatively new role in the C suite, you know, compared to you Those traditional CFOs Chief Strategy Officer, etc. How does that for you? How has that role evolved and changed in recent years? You know, I mean, it means we've got to learn new stuff, but it's new skill sets, new new new types of skill sets, probably, you know, things that were in, you know, marketers job description, a number of years ago, you talk a little bit about how it's changed in for you and your organizations.

 
Deborah Wahl 

I think that we've seen the the biggest switch is more to really solving those fundamental business problems with the strategies that you get from really understand the customer. So I'll give you example, we have a brand that GMC, incredible brand that has gone through significant growth in the past several years, more than tripled the EBIT and the value that they bring to the company, for any of you guys or gals who love trucks, and now the Denali brand. It's incredibly cool now and it's very premium, and that has been through a very disciplined approach to understanding What consumers are desiring and then staying maniacal about that discipline. And I think that is fascinating. We see that as well as you might know OnStar from General Motors, it's completely transforming to the next level in terms of solutions for customers. Now you can take on Star, not just in the car, but take it with you if you're walking in a dark place, or if you're going somewhere in certain and it has a lot of meaning. So the biggest change that I've seen in all of our any reason

 
Diana O'Brien 

over this debate about whether or not the CMO role exists or doesn't exist, different organizations, I think need to call it different things based on their maturity based on their would they be the type of work that they do and so I'd like to get away from the even the title and just start talking about the scope because the scope is cool. And I can't imagine wanting to do anything else.

 
Jenifer Berman 

It's a it's a funny thing because where we said lots of people and I agree with you completely because all of that talk about you know needing to have technology or core. We talked So many clients and I can't tell you from a financial services company to everybody's a technology company now, right? Everybody is we all

 
Jean Foster 

I did not put those words in her mouth. No, but that's our line. Everybody's a technology company.

 
Jenifer Berman 

But everyone is me. We were talking to a bank. And we're talking about cyber security and FinTech and they're a technology company. And so it's the same way that everybody's a people company, right? You have to put people first you have to put your customers first. And so I do agree with you kind of I think the fun part of the CMO is that it is about the storytelling. And I think that's the thing that's always that you still have that I don't think we've seeded that part of our jobs to others. And while we have all the technology and all the performance, that's a piece of it, there still is the core of delivering stories to people and telling them what they want, whether it's consumers and you know, from the journey from the journalism that we create, or whether it's, you know, talking about the value proposition of what our brand stands for, and that for me is always been the fun part.

 
Deborah Wahl 

I think we're going to see the pendulum swift switch. back to that, or at least land in the middle again. So we were all like, Oh, my God, all this data, look what we can do with it. And then, you know, so we sort of focused on that I think, you know, the sweet spot is right in the middle. And really people enjoying it. And it's one of my biggest issues right now, I think as you think of the mythology, I want to bust that completely, that you have analytical people and creative people is so fed up with that even from a young age when kids are in school, and they're like, oh, you're mathematical, you should go this way. And you should go. It is. It's so together. And I think that'll that's where, you know, we're in the roaring 20s. So let's work with it. I think that's what's gonna really store.

 
Jean Foster 

And actually, you're going to see on our storyteller stage, over the next few days, you're going to see a lot of discussion and debate about, you know, creative versus data and and where should it sit. So it's going to be an interesting, an interesting debate. So so let's, let's pivot a little bit since we've we've done today the title, you know, so this is a this is a tech event, the biggest tech event in the planet. And just taking our, you know, I would like I use all the time that every company is a tech company, you only have to walk around CES. And you'll see companies like like John Deere. Tomorrow, we've got Delta Airlines, you know, people ignore those guys doing a tech trade show. Well, these companies are tech companies. You all represent brands that people wouldn't think are traditional tech brands. So talk a little bit about why you guys are here and why your companies are at CES. You know what, why are you here what you're looking for? And why why CES?

 

Jenifer Berman 

Well, we're here because we report on it. Right? And so I have a team of journalists and editors who are here are walking the floors, you can go on some of the floor tours with them. And we've been here since we started I think I was looking back at some of our coverage. It was 2000 and maybe eight or 2009 where the biggest thing that people are talking about e readers right and so you know you come alive and we talked about But the first, the beginning of the conversation about the connected car was back. Nine. So, so we track that, I think from an editorial perspective, but I think the changing face of journalism and how people consume content is obviously, you know, hugely driven by, by, you know, technology and data and conversations around privacy, which will lots of people will be having is something that is very central to our brand as well.

 
Diana O'Brien 

Ours is very similar, not because we're writing but because what our business does is solve problems for clients and our clients expect us to understand the basements and technology that disrupting technologies and expect us to be able to be in the conversation and have the right relationships bring to bear all of those things to solve their problem. So it's very similar in terms of why we've got equally large group of people here, in all those different conversations in different industry was with different focus. Also that we are part of the conversation that we contribute to the conversation, and that we learned as well.

 
Deborah Wahl 

Yeah, very much the same. But it goes back to the idea of diversity of everything. The more exposure I think all of us have, and I'm thrilled when I see lots of us here from GM, because it is that you might see something that will spark an idea that you wouldn't have thought of, if you encom. And then the other thing that's really important, we're here because our mission on to have zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion. There are a lot of people playing in solutions for that. And it's really important to be part of that conversation as well. So we're adamantly focused on solving that problem. And we want to solve it at scale. So this is the place to really have a lot more of those conversations, be part of the conversation. And and also, I just love watching like from year to year, who's on the first floor who moved up, you know, it's just that is what our jobs are about, to follow and track it all.

 
Jean Foster 

So So obviously, you know, with my job which I personally think is the coolest marketing job on the planet. So maybe get the competition going here. But obviously, we're living and breathing technology here. And and the conversations I have with a lot of marketers is, yeah, it's really important that, you know, the ad tech and the mark tech stack. That's just the that's just a given, though, in our rules. But I am talking to the marketers about looking beyond that, and looking at the technologies that are going to be disrupting their industries, you know, so and so. And it's an interesting question I always have a focuses is, you know, what should marketers roles be in bringing the C suite along with them bringing the rest of the business along with them and talking about some of those technologies that are going to be disrupting their their industries or in some cases, your clients industries?

 
Jenifer Berman 

Well, I think Diana really got hit it on the head because I think it is really about helping both internally and externally, your clients navigate change. So editorially, that's what we do. We report on that, you know, we're the world's largest digital businesses public And that's what people look to us for. And whether we're talking about 5g or AI, or privacy issues, that is something about helping the the navigating change piece of it. And being a organization that needs to be at the front of that you have to walk the walk yourself, right, you have to be an organization that can iterate really quickly and move quickly. And that's where you're learning that you're learning that here. But I think it does kind of start at the, you know, it starts at the center. And,

 
Diana O'Brien 

again, I think you're spot on, I'd say that little different way of saying what you just said, but the CMO plays a role in the culture because the culture has to be that in order to reflect that out, and so you play a role there. You play a role in communicating it out terms of what you're doing. The dry the dry air, Vegas and see Yes. You also play the role, I think, where and we under play this role, I think CMOS underplay this role, that it's the connection of all of that and what it means to the customer. That's really the difference.

 
Deborah Wahl 

Take it while you can recover. But um, yeah, I think we have to identify technology that is human centric, because there's so much out here. So what do you do what you play, something that I thought was one of the coolest things in the last year, we have a brilliant team, led by a gentleman named Scott Miller, who he and his team created supercruise, which is the first hands free driving system. It's amazing. It's available in Cadillac vehicles on the CT, six. And it's been one of those things that their team created it. They were moving along with it, but until the marketing group actually sat and went and said, Oh, my God, this is amazing. It solves it. Now we're rolling it out on every Cadillac in the future, and it'll be on the whole lineup, and it wasn't sort of until that mesh of the Discussions happened, that real value because of course, it costs a lot of money to invest in any of these new technologies. And until we get scale, so I think that's our role to really help bolster, there's so much especially in a big company like General Motors has so much creativity, engineering, innovation, like brilliance that's happening in all these corners. But it really takes the marketing team to get out and experience to say, Oh, my God, that's amazing, this will go great. We can really tell the story on that bring it to life. And suddenly that advances our solutions for humanity to a whole nother level. And, you know, that's what, that's part of why we're here. And a lot of us are spending less time in meetings or doing anything else, but we're walking, we're interacting with all of the technology that's here to really be inspired by it.

 
Jenifer Berman 

I think to go ahead. I was gonna say I think jebra and she can talk about sort of 5g and automated cars, which is a lot a lot of what people are going to I mean, that's if you would talk about some of the big trends are things that people are going to be talking about this week. Obviously this the question of is this the year of 5g is just the year that it finally delivers, which I think lots of people, you'll see a lot of that on the floor. But I think that that idea of needing to be ahead and needing to be the person that's always anticipating what's on the horizon is the role of the marketer. And I think it is the role again, to sort of keep that internally communicate that you do have to be no one. We're constantly we talk so much about digital transformation, and change and iteration. And you just have to always be looking a few steps ahead. And that is the role of the marketer. And I think it is no pressure, no fun. But that's mean. But it is fun to we were talking about that kind of backstage, it is then fun to come and walk the floor and say, Well, what is coming up? And how does that work for my business? And how does that work for my customers? And what does that mean for us? And should we be going there? So you do have to make some selective decisions, but that's

 
Jean Foster 

well, so you're going to be looking at it for this week. I mean, you've obviously you talked about five gmu. You have the groups up here, you're the one who's going We're looking for all the stories in the technology. What else you looking for?

 
Jenifer Berman 

5g? IoT, right? I think there'll be lots of conversations about privacy this week for 100% sure, with the ccpa, having just sort of run out and kind of been the proxy law of the land starting on the first the connected home and AI and how that is which the intersection of audio I think with 50%, or more than 50% of all search now going through audio lots and lots of brands are thinking about what does that mean for their for their brands and their marketing as well, with the connected home I think the past few years, we've seen Alexa and Google kind of you know with their giant presences so that will be there. And I think the whole what it means for in self driving cars so I'm going to kick this to you because I'm we're all fascinated to know what does that mean? But I'm sure there's a lot

 
Deborah Wahl 

yeah, I would you I think you nailed the list. And but it is looking for what of those technologies how who's discovering and how are we looking at to provide delightful experience It's back to it's an old marketing term. But it's so much more meaningful today because all the other stuff can be, you know, so crazy. And as you're seeing this ability for 5g to help vehicle speak to each other speak to the infrastructure, we're going to have a lot more ability to do what we kind of call intuitive response like that response. We want to be use it to be ahead and pre so you know, every time you get in your car, how many of you thought like, Oh my god, now I have to program my podcast, and then my directions and I better set up who I call so that I'm not doing distracted driving, and now I have to make sure that everything's on. I think getting to the next level of that whole experience is what all the work on autonomous and 5g connectivity, etc, is going to do. And then by the way, the other part of it is keeping everyone safe. I have a 17 year old who started driving. He's super proud because I said, My sister and I wrecked our cars and the first year that we drove He's like, Mom, that's never gonna happen. I'm like, Yeah, well, you have unbelievable safety technology that tells you like when a car is in your side thing when you're backing up when you're gonna hit a curb. And it so far, it's like there's knock on wood, someone knock on wood for me so far it's working under, you know. So I think that it's all that how do we progress that next level, and then bring back the joy of all of it. Because right now in a lot of cities, like if you drive in LA, or Chicago or anywhere, it is such a nightmare to drive now. So that's the next thing, looking at how these technologies help us on that.

 
Diana O'Brien 

I just going to build on that for a minute because I think what I'm most interested in maybe isn't even technology, to be honest. It's looking for those that are looking to partner to create the delightful experience and connecting the dots in December on the smart home, which I tend to follow the smart home because of kids that I have that have some disabilities and so I like to understand what's going on in that space. Google, Amazon and apple in December all agreed to work together on the smart home. so that people could use multiple technologies together. I think that is what's really going to allow us to explode. And it's going to happen in the car with all the delights that will be able to happen when 5g enables that it's going to happen in the smart home, it's going to end that, to me, is when we took down a barrier that stands in the way of us realizing what all the potential is of what's available today.

 
Jenifer Berman 

It's also the the Smart Home is also and make a micro way of looking at what's going to happen at the smart city level. So that's a year talking about that in terms of automated cars and self driving cars. And I think we'll see that too. I think the impacts on smart cities and what does that mean from an infrastructure standpoint, and with you know, wildfires sort of, you know, devastating Australia right now, there are lots of issues about you know, what can some of these technologies do to

 
Deborah Wahl 

Yeah, that's really interesting lately is all the advances we've made over the last five, six years have just really made those core human problems worse. So we really have to push together to get through that hump and make it better. And it's as simple as that. And that's what I all the work is going and then we need to do it. And that's sort of the fun of, you know, the challenge. I think that's inspiring everyone.

 
Jean Foster 

You know, this, this is a really important point. I mean, one of the key area focus for us as a consumer Technology Association, you know, are rules. First and foremost, a member organization, we've got 2000 members from the technology community throughout the US. So the role that we're looking for the industry to play in some of those challenges, be climate change, you know, be addressing things like like, you know, like, like gender challenges and gender disadvantages. You know, we've talked about health care, we really strongly believe that the tech industry has an important role playing to address those nearish are going to see a lot more of that. I'll encourage you guys to to attend some of those. keynote sessions over the next couple of days because we've got some, some good stories, but some exciting announcements coming out on on that as well. So, so with all these, I want to kind of just pivot back then to your day job because, you know, with all of these technologies that represent tremendous opportunity, but also tremendous disruption. Going back to them, what does that I think, you know, both Diana and and Jen, you mentioned, the role of the marketer is to help your organization navigate through that those changes talk a little bit more, but that what does that mean at a practical level? In terms of, you know, when you come back from from CES, you're going to be talking about technologies, how are you going to help your organization or you know, bring some of those those ideas and suggestions but your organization

 
Jenifer Berman 

and I think for us, because I kind of kind of going back to its, we have a we have a kind of motto internally at inside our which is Really about kind of this better every day. And so I think while I do think so there is sort of, again, this iteration that's kind of built into the core, I think when we come back, some of what we're doing is helping to tell these helping to identify these trends internally. And then a lot of that is also how we're helping to communicate that to our clients. I mean, I don't know, it's hard to say, because, well, I think I knit the organization together. I think that there are lots of people on the editorial side who are coming in with these big ideas. And so sort of they know that probably what we are dealing with on the marketing side more than anything is thinking about some of how we're engaging with our consumers and how we're employing those technologies and privacy issues, how we as we deal with our consumers, we're Our job is to, you know, tell our consumers what they want to know and what they need to know. But we know that being focused about that, that the data piece of it and how we're generating and how we're gleaning insights from our consumers is a piece of that and so I think that there's a lot of I'm interested here to see how other brands are navigating through that, because we need to come back and think about, it helps us understand your behavioral habits more, because we use the data to sort of help target and give you content that you're interested in. But we need to make sure that we're transparent about that we need to make sure that we're doing it in a way that feels safe and, and doesn't make people feel that, obviously, their insights and their information is being taken from them in a way that is being used by bad actors. I think that that whole conversation around data and privacy is just a huge one that we're all like waiting into this year, which is a big one.

 
Diana O'Brien 

For us, I would say, one, because we're here having conversations with, you know, on stage in different forums with clients, you're going to be participating in one of ours, the, for us, it's taking those discussions and the insights from those discussions, and then following back up and making sure that one our executive team understands that and understands the value of coming because it's expensive, we participate. We want to We want to make sure they know what we're getting for it. And there's a lot of value gained from those conversations and insights that we draw back. From a tech standpoint specifically, one of the things we do is for those areas that aren't delivering directly to clients, in the area of technology, we asked all of our professionals to be tech savvy, and we have levels of sophistication in that that we ask people to go through. And that's being tech savvy means that you are able to really understand business issues, even if your job is as an auditor, we want you to be tech savvy, because a tech enabled audit is cheaper, is more effective is is better for our clients. So those are the kinds of things that we we want to take back from here. But honestly, we've learned so much by participating that it just starts a big dialogue in our organization. Ever

 
Deborah Wahl 

When I think about this, The change that it needs to happen to really start addressing these challenges that we've listed. If you look at the opportunity, I think one that corporations like General Motors have to play a very significant role of that. If we just take one of the zeros that I mentioned zero emissions, our role is to really help move the entire country and eventually global world, into the electric vehicle world. We believe that that is the future. We believe climate change is real that that is going to be a major contribution to that challenge. So when you think of the weight of that, how do we, as companies help do that? That's what we want to be bringing back. It's not a simple mission of fun that we're here on. We're here to really think about how do we advance that we need for all of our benefits to accelerate it, GM will be announcing over 20 electric vehicles by 2023 We're moving Cadillac is moving into an all electric future. The President Cadillac right now says we entered the decade as an ice vehicle, you know, typical typical transmissions and will exit as all electric. So will be the end of the Ice Age by this decade. My favorite line that Steve Carla said, That's so true. But it's that's really momentous and important. And I think that's what we're all doing here to inspire each other and work together with everyone and all of our partners. Think about how the heck do we do that faster?

 
Jenifer Berman 

I think there's real truth in that. And Deborah says, and I think we know there's a lot of talk about tech for good. We have a platform called that are capitalism and Business Insider, which is really focusing obviously on the role that corporations and the leadership is exactly as you're talking about are taking to help sort of solve these larger problems and in vacuums of trust and vacuums of leadership. It's really about business that's helping drive change. This is a place technology is a the forefront of change. And that's really what's happening here. And so lots of whether it's tech for good in terms of autonomous cars or helping climate change, there are many, many lessons that we can all learn here and look at the ways in which businesses helping to solve these larger issues. And we report on that regularly. And it's hugely, hugely important.

 
Jean Foster 

Great, so we're kind of kind of down the clock here. So I know that we don't have a huge amount of time left. Let's just kind of wrap up, but you know, so you always have to end up panel with a prediction. So we're gonna actually look in the future get your crystal balls, oh, you know, what is on the horizon for the CMO and say, the next five years? What will cmo his job look like? Who wants to go first?

 
Diana O'Brien 

Well, I think in many ways, it's going to be exactly the same. I think you're going to need to bring strategic thinking skills about the customer. I think that you'll be using technology and creativity and data and all of those things will come together. I think You'll have you have a more important role I think that we will we as a community of marketers will have established ourselves more successfully regardless of the title to make the influence there, but I think what will will need to appreciate is what you were talking about which is this case of change and how quickly this is going to happen once it once it really gets momentum and the when you think about an ambient experience and and you know, ambient intent when there's no device when everything's adapting to you, you know, marketers job will be amazing, but Gosh, will that be hard to and and I just think Yeah, I don't think it's in the near term. But I think that's what we're aspiring to and that's what you're trying to do with you know, the evolution of your of your vehicles is to get to where there's no device and and it's all connected and that's that you know, when all that friction is gone, boy, that is a happy place. Yeah.

 
Deborah Wahl 

Whole New World. Yeah, that's what I see, I think our role, we started talking about how we need to be contributors and really change. I think that powers up even more. And I think that our role in helping our customers achieve this. I mean, you just again, look at things happen by decades. First, last decade of technology was just a mess. It was, you know, all kinds of things happening, everything developing Well, now we have to grow up and really put it to good use. And I think marketing will play a key role on that in that.

 
Jenifer Berman 

Yeah, I would say the same. I mean, getting it back to the idea of growth. I think the idea that, I don't think it's going to change all that much, but I do think that the where the marketer sits in terms of helping to drive drive growth and all of these things that we've all talked about ultimately contribute to that. The last decade, it was 2007, when we were founded in 2007. But that was also the year that you know, the I mean, that was like you know, that was like Ground Zero year and There's been obviously in the past 12 years, so much that have changed that's come from that and the mobility that we're talking about. So I don't see that slowing down at all, I only see that continuing to accelerate and some of what we're talking about in terms of, you know, IoT and 5g that's just going to keep moving, you know, will be, we were talking 10 years ago about the E reader. So 10 years ago, 10 years from now, we'll be talking about the, you know, you know, connected cars and, and self driving cars as being flying flying cars, right. We don't know. But I think it will still mean that the role of the CMO needs to be a few steps ahead to continue to help to translate that both internally and externally.

 
Jean Foster 

Well, thank you were run that time. That was a great discussion. I want to thank you all for your time. I was just looking through some of the notes of some of the comments that you you've made here. So I think everybody's agreed that you're all claiming you've got the best jobs in the C suite. So now the debate is like who's got the best job, you know, like on this stage, we're all claiming that one as well. I think you know, you're in agreement that it's not about either data or creativity, creativity, we got to have both, you know, to really drive it this this rule. You know, with Jen, you guys are you're a digital native company, you're only 12 year old, you're here. You're just still a baby, you're starting out, you know you're focused on is the chief growth officer and Elsa, head chief collaboration officer. There were obviously a very global career, but you're back in the heartland and, and you think all good things come from the middle. I like that line. And then obviously, you know that Diana, you and I have known each other for some time. You know, I think you know, for me that one of the strongest comments from us titles irrelevant. Let's start talking about the title, whether it's revenue or growth or marketing, you know, the role is required, and it's really a role that brings the rest of the C suite along through the organization and really encouraged all of us brands are really focusing on a bigger take story and a tech for good that is so important to us as an industry. And as I said, you're going to hear a lot more about that over over the next the next few days here because we all have a role to play in driving, you know, driving greater good and addressing global problems. And I think the main takeaway for everybody is it's not going to slow down and it's just going to get quicker. So thank you all for your time. Please help me. Thank you. And I encourage everybody to stay around for the next session which starts in about 10-12 minutes.

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