Jennifer Taylor 

Morning everybody and welcome to our next future of work topic. We are going to To be discussing the growth of apprenticeships for new collar jobs. For those of you who may not know or who were here last year, we announced at CES on the keynote stage in 2019, the creation of the CTA apprenticeship coalition. And this is a collaborative effort of many of our tech companies, and intermediaries, we'll talk a little bit about what intermediaries are coming together and really promoting the value of apprenticeships and working together to create their own apprenticeship programs. You know, many people still refer and think of apprenticeship programs as relevant for the blue collar trades. But the reality is, this is now a pathway that has great opportunity and can be made available for new collar jobs or tech related jobs. And we're going to talk about what a new collar job means. So, you know, I think all of you in the room are very aware of the nation skills gap and Our country only graduates just over 60,000 computer science graduates a year. So there really is a great need to tap into talent that has often been overlooked in the tech sector and invite them into participating in these jobs. Last year on the CES keynote stage, we heard personal stories of people who now have jobs at IBM through apprenticeships, and their stories were really amazing there. You saw a barista firefighter, a young author. We had a veteran and a dreamer and they're having amazing access to tech company to tech related roles through apprenticeships. And so we're a year now into our our coalition. And today we have members representing our coalition here. And I'm really pleased to say that all the organizations that are on our coalition are involved in adopting an apprenticeship program or are part of the ecosystem to enable tech companies to do that. So we're making great progress and we're going to continue to drive awareness and help our member companies grow and scale their apprenticeships. So I'm going to introduce our panelists, and then we're going to have a conversation. And after that, we will take some questions from the audience. Because if any of you are interested in joining our coalition, we would love you to do that. And we also invite you to network with our member companies. So first, I'm going to introduce Nick New he is the co founder of an organization called American Apprenticeships.work and he has years of experience with apprenticeship in the UK. So we have a lot to learn from their experience. We have Charlie Ackerman SVP of human resources from Bosch and Jennifer Oddo, Program Manager, workforce partnerships and apprenticeship that IBM she leads their apprenticeship program and strategy and Jeb Ory, co founder and CEO of Phone2Action. So a smaller tech company, but even they are adopting apprenticeships. So it doesn't matter what size organization you are. It's a great solution for for all.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

So with that, welcome, everybody.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

Glad to be here.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

It's so good to see you guys. It's been a fun year. It has been a fun year. So Jennifer, on behalf of CTA, I just want to thank you for your role in our coalition, you and your company, as our co chair, and you've just been instrumental to helping our member companies kind of get out of a state of inertia or explore something new, new apprenticeship just is new is kind of new to the tech sector. They haven't relied on this. So you're helping field questions or traveling to our member companies or hand holding them, you know, as they take this journey, so I'm going to ask you a few questions. First, why did IBM decide to share its apprenticeship program with other tech companies is this part of their corporate social responsibility efforts like they do that?

 
Jennifer Oddo 

So IBM launched our apprenticeship program back in 2017 in the fall 2017. And since then we have over 450 apprentices amazing through our program in over 25 occupations, software engineering, cyber security, data science, data analytics, technical sellers. So we are constantly adding new positions to our partnership program. And so it's been a very exciting journey. And as we've learned from this journey, we really realized the value and the impact that these apprentices can have on an organization. So as part of the CTA coalition, we are open collaborating, sharing our toolkits, sharing our playbooks, even our standard or occupational standards that are required as part of the Department of Labor. Additionally, we are actually going out to member companies like Bosch like Sony and others to conduct design thinking workshops with their business leaders so that they can understand how these apprenticeship programs AMS can impact their own business. And so it's been very cool to see through these sessions on these design workshops, the ideation that goes on with these member companies.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Thanks, Jen. So, I think how many of you have heard the term new collar worker? Raise your hand. That's awesome. Okay, so, Ginni Rometty, the CEO of IBM talks about the new collar worker quite a bit. Jen, how do you guys define it at at IBM,

 
Jennifer Oddo  

right, so a new collar worker, it is about skills over degrees. With the skills at the center of the labor market today, we really need to place a greater emphasis on hiring people for their their ability, not for their pedigree, if that makes sense. So new collar workers, we have a bunch of different pillars. So our new collar worker could be the experienced hire who's experienced hire who's coming in with no degree but maybe 10 years of experience. Maybe they got their education through a boot camp or through being self taught somehow. IBM is also formally set up three pillars of new color in our own organization, the first of which is apprenticeship programs, which is really about bringing in those who maybe have a little bit of knowledge and training them for the skill. We also have our tech Reentry Program, which we're very proud of where we are bringing in those who maybe left the workforce for a period of time and come back into rescale them to do the jobs in it. And then the last pillar that we have is our P tech partnership. And for those who may not be familiar with P tech, it is a 46 year high school that IBM created out of first one was out of New York. And the goal is for those students to come out with both their high school diploma and their associate's degree, and that six year period but what we're finding is a lot of those individuals are actually completing their program and for years and going on to a more advanced degree, or they're coming into various programs within our new collar initiatives.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

So these jobs are, you know, these apprentice double roles that are that you have like in mainframe and cloud computing software engineers data analyst, why are these jobs important to IBM and your clients? And let's talk about mainframe for an example. The dynamic going on there that you have retired employees, right? Are these Why is it those right?

 
Jennifer Oddo 

And it's not just about being important to IBM or our clients. But these initiatives are really important to all of industry, and anybody participating and industry four dot O. And you know, we as business leaders and all of us business leaders, it's now become a national parents imperative that we have to prioritize the future of work, to be able to advance our own economies are our people and the innovations that our companies are creating

 
Jennifer Taylor 

I'm gonna ask you a couple more questions. What does it mean to be a registered apprenticeship? You know, some people don't fully know what a registrate

 
Jennifer Oddo 

registered apprenticeships, I think one of the first things to realize is that these are federally funded and federally regulated programs. So it is very important to really, you know, understand that and even there's a lot of state agencies who also can stand up apprenticeship programs, but they do follow the Department of Labor guidelines for these. And why that's important is you know, this is a program where HR public policy, and the government, the education, everything's coming together as a one ecosystem to really advance the workforce strategies of our economies. And so when you when you look at the challenges that we have mainframe is a great example we have in our mainframe world, a lot of those individuals are baby boomers, they're leaving the economy soon, instead We have to do more to create the workforce using these apprenticeship programs. Yeah.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Great. Thank you. So I'm going to now switch to Bosch for a second. So Bosch is a German company, it has a history of apprenticeships. And I'd like to know why apprenticeships are valuable to Bosch, Charlie. And how do they benefit both the company and the apprentice? And then you also offer, you know them in the United States as well.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

That's right. Yeah. So we've got a rich heritage of, of apprenticeship programs. When we first launched some of our operations here in the United States back in the late 70s. At the very beginning, there were apprenticeship programs right then. But those apprenticeship programs were filling a need relative to what we would call our setup mechanics. Okay, in in our operations there. When you begin looking at the quality of and expertise that was needed, we found that, again, within the market, we did not have the sufficient skills to be able to run our operations back in the 70s. Back in the 70s. So since that time, we've always feel that so it's been, again, what we need. When you began looking at the educational institutions that would provide the type of skills that we need steel, they didn't have the right focus in their local community colleges or whatever. So again, when you start thinking of the types of products that we have, where the tolerances are plus or minus one micron, people sometimes didn't really understand what that is. Okay? So be able to run an operation like that is extremely important. So today, we still find ourselves in a situation, the labor economics Do we have sufficient talent that we need to be able to run our operations as we begin to accelerate our business in the area of IoT And when you begin looking at artificial intelligence, making some of our products more intelligent, we really look to the market. And we're not finding what we're what we need. So once again, its history repeating itself. And we're different skill set. Exactly, exactly. So that's fundamentally what it is right now. And when you're trying to look for talent, you have the ability to buy it, borrow it, or build it. And we've selected the build strategy very clearly. And we're having great success with Jennifer already. So it's good.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

I have to commend you because you're taking you know, the past year and a half, you've taken a leap forward and said, You know what, we're going to expand our apprenticeship program for these new collar jobs. We're an IoT company. These are the skill sets we need. We're not just going to rely on universities to fill it. We've got to find it and build it in other ways. So how did you talk to me about The experience to seek the buy in from your president and from your top leadership team, because sometimes our member companies are saying they have a hard time getting from the top. So if you don't have it, it's hard to deploy it. Yeah. What would you know? What was your experience at Bosch? And what would you recommend to companies that they need to convince their leadership? Sure.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

I think the very first thing is is to be able to say first, we work for an incredible leader, man sweating, a strong belief in a people centered organization, that's number one. But then, when you're looking at the ability to supply what is needed in talent in the organization through all the different divisions that we have, those are the real customers. And the the ability to provide them the speed with the talent that they need to be able to secure projects programs. In when when you start looking deeper into our ability to respond to those needs. It can't be one year two year old will finally get the talent, you know, they need it right now. So what we've done is that we've given the leadership and assurance that we're going to every six months, ask the strategic question, What do you need? Really? What do you need in some of these critical areas? So when we did our first sampling of this, and it's consistent now, as an example, we needed 342 software engineers. And so how do we supply that? Well, you know, you're not gonna be able to build that and you're going to be still forced to buy that. It the model becomes very easy to say that if in one year I can produce one, or 10% or 20% of those are you in pretty easy, right? So the business case, very simply, it's a business case. And I've said this before the HR organization of any group, if the if the burden of Human Resources lands on your shoulder, some small organizations, it lands on them. Well, they have to do it. They have to really, they have to build the business case. And frankly, right now, it's quite easy.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Okay, I'm glad to hear that

 
Nick New 

kind of building what Charlie said is, you know, I have been in the industry working with companies for for two decades helping to solve these talent problems. And we all seem to recycle the same strategies, the same people. And at the end, our cost per hire is gone through the roof, our retention is is high because people are leaving for the next big buck. And our productivity declines to the value and ROI of apprenticeship. I mean, this is really about eliminating kind of that technical debt when it comes to Workforce Strategy, and taking a more build approach to your strategy over that by borrow mentality.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

I'm glad you brought The value of ROI. Because there's research and data that says, you know, an apprenticeship is apprentice is very loyal to the organization that has given them the opportunity. So your retention is higher. And that's, that's, you know, that's another way another piece to incorporate into the business.

 
Jennifer Oddo 

Right, right. We are experiencing about 96% retention of our apprentices. That's awesome. It's extraordinary.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Thanks for sharing that. Now, Charlie, you guys did something really extraordinary. You said a year ago, Jen, we're joining this coalition. I gotta hire 350 software engineers, my lines, my business lines need this. I'm going to make this happen. And you've already in it was like in seven months, registered a software engineer apprenticeship program with the Department of Labor, right? How did you do that? How did you get everybody in? room, you know, for the same week to approve every process and get that done? Well, I gotta write an article on that.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

First off, it didn't happen alone. But I think the inspiration really came from the meeting that you guys hosted, you know, in Washington, thanks for the invitation. We needed it. And I told Jennifer earlier that it was a it was an incredible design workshop to understand the capabilities of what you had to offer. All I needed was is to be enabled, I had the need. So when you begin to break down any change in an organization, I look at it in the design phase, the installation phase, the enabling and the optimization. So this is a very consistent pattern of what we talk about inbox, this is what makes us makes us successful. So I go back to the organization and I said, you think We can do this in one week. What? Exactly. So I asked you guys at the conference, I said, If I go back and I mobilize the resources, can you show up? And can we get this done in one week? And what did I say? Yes.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

At least that's what I heard.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

And you also pulled together, you know, kind of a lean Agile process, and got all your key stakeholders in the room. And I remember you telling me, you know, there's a process a part where your legal team needs to make some approvals and review and make approvals before filing it with the Department of Labor and you mobilized everybody and you made sure their desks were clear. That's right, that they weren't, it wasn't on the side of their desk, and I'll get to that later.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

And I will tell you, I mean, really a shout out here for Kavita feschi, our Director of associate development, Tim Frazier, which is a regional president committed to this initiative. And then also now the program lead which is Chris Morgan. This is actually Going to drive this apprenticeship program to it's gonna follow it. So but you know, what we were also good at is we said can we scrum this process? All right. And we we got everybody's mindset together saying if we can get 15 to 20 colleagues in the room at the same time, can we get this done all the way through this playbook. And IBM created IBM created. And we did it, I love it. We did it in one week.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

You went through the workbook,

 
Charlie Ackerman 

that's every step of the way, and checked and again, look at all of the the waste that we took out of the organization, if you can commit the organization, to the simple principles, commitment, true commitment. It's amazing what kind of waste you can take out and what kind of outcome that you can achieve.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Great case study, and I'm so excited to follow it. And then we're going to report out on it over the year next year too. So Jeb, from phone2action They, their apprenticeship journey has been a little bit more grassroots. And it's an excellent example of how a small business and a startup if you will, should also consider an offer apprenticeships. So, Jeb, can you tell us tell the audience about how you launched your fellowship program, talk to us about your fellowship program. And then when you decided to, you know, extend it and offer apprenticeships?

 
Jeb Ory 

Absolutely. Thank you for having me. So we have about 100% software company. We make software for grassroots advocacy campaigns, so organizations that want to mobilize people around issues, can use our software to do that. As a software company, we're competing against Bosch to hire software engineers, and Google and Facebook and, you know, Amazon, we're based in Washington, DC, and we want we want Amazon and now we have to staff against it. So it becomes an imperative to try to figure out the right way to bring in new talent. That's something that we spend all of our time thinking about. So Two, four years ago, we started a fellowship program, which is basically a structured summer internship for undergraduate, High School and postgraduate folks that wanted to come work in a software company. We try to get people from non traditional backgrounds, not just CS majors. And I think just I don't know where everyone's understanding of what an apprenticeship program is versus like a internship or fellowship, but I'll break it down from my perspective because I didn't have a lot of clarity on this even a year ago, but, you know, an internship or a fellowship is a usually like a summer program a couple months. And you know, depending on how you organize it, you can put a certain amount of resources against it. A an apprenticeship is a government recognized program that's nine months or 12 months. You have to register with the Department of Labor or with one of the State Department of Labor's to do this. And it allows you to, you know, employ people in a kind of a new role and give them some skills and training along the way. And it's usually for career switchers. So we started off with the summer fellowship program. And then we saw that the fellows that we had that stayed on board were the most committed, you know, the people that came over. And maybe that you come as a junior, then you come back after you graduate. And they would go into the more the entry level jobs, our technical operations, which is in between our customer support and our engineering, though we had a big gap in our QA that's also a kind of a tough department to staff. And what tech ops and QA. I have some specific examples. I'm happy to share at the right time.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

That's great. And I'm glad you tapped into defining an apprenticeship because we didn't do that and I am Just going to take a minute to highlight what the construct of an apprenticeship includes. In my opinion, it's five key things. It has required training instruction that you'll hear that referred to as RTI. So there is like structured training, there is on the job, work experience, they're actually working. You know, as part of the apprenticeship, they have a dedicated mentor. So that is a third component. They are compensated for the job that they're doing as they progress and learn more skills than their compensation increases. And then lastly, when they're finished, they have a portable, recognizable what's the word I'm looking for certificate and Yep, and it's portable. So if they end up deciding they don't want to work at the company that the apprenticeship opportunity, which sometimes happens because life happens, they move or They know something. So it's portable, and it's valuable to other companies. So, you know, I just wanted to take a minute to describe that and also, through the coalition, CTA published an apprenticeship white paper, we have the URL up there, I highly recommend that you download it. Our team worked with our member companies to really break down what an apprenticeship system apprenticeship is, how you can create one, the process to register it, the resources that are available through intermediary. So this is going to be a good segue, we can talk to Nick in a minute. And I highly recommend that you tap into that if you want a quick learn learning opportunity about apprenticeships. So we welcome you to do that. And also, if any of you want to join the apprenticeship coalition, please come see me because we would love to have you. So, Jeb, couple more questions. So you ended up deciding this path Summer had you have your fellows, I've seen your fellows I've met them I've gone to your graduations these students there. They're either from high schools or school universities that come for the summer. You guys are giving them real life projects work. I've seen them give their presentations, their acid, you know code and solve various, you know, customer experience solutions or whatnot and in your, in your software. What convinced you or what? Why did you decide to offer extended an offer a couple apprenticeships, like software? And just so you know, what

 
Jeb Ory 

Charlie mentioned earlier about how, first of all, like, how can we orient ourselves to be more attractive and to compete, because ultimately, there's just a bare knuckle fight for talent. And, yeah, we can you can pay somebody any amount of money to be able to bring them in. There's always going to be other choices out there. So it's gonna be impossible for us. For a smaller company, and a person company to have the top comp package for every single engineer that we want to hire, it's not going to happen. So we have to do is look at other ways that we can create more opportunities to bring talent into the organization. So when we identify people that may have gone through a bootcamp like a general assembly or something like that we had one, one of our apprentices floor is a young mother, single mother, she went to like a boot camp tech boot camp for single mothers like this is something in the Bay Area. And then we brought her on as a fellow. And then there was an opportunity to bring her on full time. So she started off and she moved into our tech operations team. And she's doing real front end Computer Engineering now. And in about nine months, we think she's going to have nine additional months, she's going to have the skills that she's going to need to be a, you know, a full kind of early career one to two year software engineer. that's going to mean you know, larger salary for her and many more opportunity. Nice, and but we're getting value immediately from her. We also have a couple other fellows, one in QA, which again is a hard department, the staff is that was particularly hard for phone to action. But we found someone that was really excited about two to two fellows actually, that we're really excited about this. We turn them into apprentices. And they are some of the most committed people that we have in the company. And QA is hard. I mean, you have to go through and they're manually testing live software. In fact, there's a there's a selfie station here, if you come across, you should take a picture. And that was QA by Peter, one of our fellows, and one of our one of our apprentices. But we view it as giving us competitive edge because we can now bring people in that are high aptitude but maybe not high experience and give them some cross training. And then, you know, we it's a kind of a win, win win.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

How did you convince your investors to spend dollars on your future workforce through the fellowship through the apprenticeship? I mean, how did that

 
Jeb Ory 

Well, ultimately, we, you know, we we've identified what works well for phone to action, and our investors just appreciate that. And they're like, great, like, What's going well, you guys should keep doing it. And if you found a way to, like, build talent and bring talent in, in a way that's cost effective, then you should keep doing more of that. But there's a real ROI to this. So if you think about what you spend on recruiting and the cost of a miss hire, it becomes very apparent very quickly. Because if you're going to spend 20% Plus, you know, that's what we would spend to replace an engineer, or to replace any employee if we use like a, you know, recruiting firm, and then if we get the wrong person, so we invest a couple months in to train that person, they churn out, that could be six months of a salary down the drain. And meanwhile, you give us a an apprentice for six months, that's really excited. And if they work with the right team with the right manager, and that's really important. That manager can grow that person to be much more productive in their careers, and maybe that person that you would have misfired on a great.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Can you tell me a personal experience of one of your apprentices or one of your fellows that then became an apprentice, what they say about the experience.

 
Jeb Ory 

So this this just happened this week. So we gave a, an offer letter to dren Who is he joined as a summer fellow. And he had a career in private wealth management. So he wasn't fresh out of college. He was coming off of this career, and he really wanted to change career. So he'd been working at large institutions. And when he came to fund to action, he was kind of taken aback by like, how open and transparent and flat our culture was, in a good way. So so he got in and he, you've been yet yeah. So he got his hands dirty. And he was able to start to work with the engineering team and make some, you know, some real solutions for customers, which is very exciting to him. And then we just, you know, we're able to offer him the apprenticeship, so we gave him An offer letter on Monday. And he wanted to come speak with me right after I said, Great, come on off, doors open. And he sat down, he said, look when you and my co founder when when you gave me this opportunity to come in as a fellow, I was excited, but I didn't really know what it would do for my career. But this is one of the most exciting days that I've had. Because I recognize in your company, a way that I can grow to become somebody great in a career that I really want to be in. And it was it was one of the most profound moments I've had as a you know, as a leader, because this you know, he was probably making a lot more money in his previous career. But what he valued is the the transparency and the ability to grow. And we had recently hired a new manager for him, who's been wonderful. And we're seeing the results with both drin and floor both under the same manager and they're really starting to prosper. So I think that's the other that's the other important piece. You have to have the right management structure meyen make these programs work? If you don't, you know, they may not be successful. But if you do, you get these wonderful feedback loops.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

And, Jeb, what a testament to you as a leader, that your door is open, that an apprentice feels comfortable to come and talk to that that is amazing. And if he came from the financial industry, which I think I say, very hierarchical, you know, you're not going to necessarily have the opportunity to talk to the CEO. So that's really awesome. It was a great conversation. Yeah. All right, Mr. New, so glad to have you on the panel. I want to talk about your international experience, and then we'll talk about what you're doing in the United States. We talked about this a lot. Why is the apprenticeship model just seems it just has better greater adoption and acceptance as a pathway into a meaningful career in in Europe compared to the United States? Why is that?

 
Nick New 

I mean, the number of reasons, primarily the length of time that they've been invested in, and various political and social and governmental reasons, Northern European economies are quite happy to invest in the education of their young people as part of the future ROI of their nation's workforce. So you see this in in the UK as a massive initiative to scale apprenticeships, and to make them applicable for people and that started their career where they're switching their career or whether they're accelerating their career. And so those three areas have become big focuses for anyone who is, you know, keen to get involved, there is government funding their employers willing to engage in it that hasn't come without some effort by the private and public partnerships that have brought this about? And then in parallel to that, I think, you know, everybody has felt this sort of change over the last sort of 10 years that going to college used to mean that you go to college, and then you get a Job, that whole social contract is kind of changed. And it's it's tough work for everybody to get where they need to be. And I think this framework of how you learn, and really focus skills on what the business needs and what the individual needs to get their career going, really distills well into apprenticeships. Mm hmm.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

And Nick and I were talking this morning, he served up a great idea for the coalition. And that is, I think what we want to do in the new year is highlight and showcase more personal stories of the apprentices and showing their experience and how valuable it is to them. And then together we can like make a greater impact and show these stories. Because we also in our country, need to inform influencers like our parents, parents about you know, the apprentice, apprenticeship is an amazing way to get a long term high paying job you want to talk about that at all. I mean,

 
Nick New 

you know, one of the distinctive appearances we've had from from the UK. And I actually think Germany are a bit further ahead than the UK in this, in that making parents understand that if a young person comes to them and says, actually, I'm going to go into an apprenticeship, or I'm graduated college, I'm gonna go do an apprenticeship for their parents not to freak out. Yeah. And for those people in their cohort to not give them a hard time for it to be for it to have the recognition that it deserves, and not the stigma. And in Germany, the significantly higher engagement levels of apprenticeships nationwide, I mean, something like 60% of young people engaging in apprenticeship and somewhere on here,which is huge, right. You know, in the UK, if you did the representative number, that they have their apprenticeships in the US for 4 million apprentices. And we're about 7000 now.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Over 500,000 Yeah, we're not quite there yet. The Department of Labor does have the name number on their website. 691. I think you did it over. Oh, gosh. Okay. So it's gone up even more. It's I mean, there's So much in this Okay, so many initiatives. So that's good. Yeah. So yes, please, Charlie.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

it was I think it was last year year before last I can't remember which year it was but Dwight came out with some very interesting information that by 2025 2 million jobs in manufacturing will go unfilled because of the skills gap. And so even furthers this, this reason for, you know, creating a build strategy. So, yeah, it's there. And and and then the other thing too, is this this component associated with if, if a child or student decides, Hey, Mom, Dad, I'd like to go work in this manufacturing plant. The question is, will that person get support? Right? Will they will they be constantly directed toward a four year degree from the parents or will they give them the opportunity say, you know what, what I expect you to do is I expect you to take the track to go through a local community college or technical college. Very, very important. It sure is. And so this social fabric and and value proposition has to be better understood. I mean, manufacturing is not like it was years ago. Right, right. I mean, clean there are there are clean rooms for manufacturing the technology that we have. That's equal to any pharmaceutical company. You have to have, right? Yeah. So we need to need to change that.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

I went on a tour of this company called Endor. They make the power trains for Ford in Blacksburg, Virginia area, and the robots are behind glass, like rooms. People don't touch them. The workers there behind it. It was the most beautiful thing, like orcas orchestrated. And it was really cool to see. So yeah, they're very good. clean. They're very sophisticated, you need technical skills to operate them. Yeah.

 
Nick New 

But the branding of apprenticeships, which is what we're kind of nicely talking about, we often hear the debate around four year degrees, and it should be to have a four year degree reliance and so on. But in truth, the American workforce and most nation's workforces are full of middle skills. And it says middle schools areas that are going to need more reskilling and when we talk about higher engineer, we've got this great four year degree person, we've got this fantastic future potential for leaders. We can't all be leaders, and there's millions and millions of people are going to be dislocated in their roles by AI and automation. who aren't you know, we don't want another 10 15% unemployment in the next five years. We want to give these people an avenue to get into a new career, right. It's not going back to college.

 
Nick New 

even talking about the workforce there today to your point, I mean, a lot of these jobs are changing, but we're already at deficit. We're only we have 700,000 open it jobs today and the 64,000 graduates every year, and male So early producing 10% of the the talent that's needed to fill the jobs today. So we don't have time for students to go industry does not have time for all the students to go through four year degree. That's right. So it makes sense for them to go through.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

And a lot of these new color apprenticeships Are you know, can be done in 2000 hours, right. So about a year, so about a year. Yeah, exactly. That's great. So Nick, tell us about your new organization, American apprenticeships work so you're bringing all your knowledge and experience you offered all those amazing apprenticeships primarily from what I know about you. I'm in the advertising marketing sector in the UK. I know that was one area you know, so because that's very much a technical job and is becoming more so with with the use of you know, social media and, and digital marketing. So what is your new organization doing? Well, I mean, after 10

 

Nick New 

years of being involved in digital transformation and helping organizations build the skills and capabilities to do that. We know apprenticeships is a big part. All of that, not the only part. But we started about four months ago, American apprenticeships work focuses on helping large organizations build the skills they need to succeed. And so that's about planning. It's about piloting. And it's about scaling. Not always can it be done in a week, I would love to learn. But, you know, mostly it's a sort of two to six month process to get that alignment and preparation to pilot. And then you need to do a pilot, if you really are committed to doing it at scale. You need to just get going get learning and iterate. Constantly Agile process of right, let's dig in, let's learn. And, you know, it takes a village. That partnership between government and private enterprise, the teachers, the mentors, the, you know, the philanthropists, the trade bodies, like the CTA, I mean, so much work has been done by yourself as a guiding light. And you Jennifer on The CTI coalition making this theme accessible. But it is it's accessible and totally and I were even talking this morning. You know, when you go the when you think about implementing a program that has government teeth behind it, whether it be regulation funding, it seems a little daunting, then you add on the HR components and any of us in HR know that you've got a complicated world. And really what the CTA coalition has really strive to do over the past year is really deconstruct and simplify it in a way that, you know, is relevant to the business leaders out there. And I think Bosh, Sony has also gone through through the process as well. It's not a complicated process. And we again, we're really working to help organizations understand it's easy, it's flexible. There's a lot of grant funding behind it. If we learned from the future of our keynote, Mr. Trump yesterday talked about there's $300 million worth of funding available to hire apprentices to be used towards project Support training. There's additional incentives and offsets that are available for through the veoa. They're different channels. So, again, the state's reps, the the federal reps at the Department of Labor there, there are people there to help you on your journey, pick up the phone, make a call, tell them you want to start an apprenticeship program. And it's literally that easy. So I encourage you all to do that. And we were talking about what you did with the state of Virginia.

 
Jeb Ory 

Yeah, I mean, there's actually not a lot to say there. It was so easy. The application process, it took like two minutes. And Jen right there, did it. My chief of staff and, and she said it was so easy that she thought there was something missing or that it was incomplete because it was you know, it's like, yeah, 15 fields, and I was at summit. And then we you know, we found out a couple, I guess weeks later that we were approved. So really simple. So sorry, I can't give you

 
Jennifer Taylor 

know, Virginia was it was you know, they picked up the phone. They had the conversation. Yeah, it was a rather easy step. You know, it's a little longer with the Department of Labor. But, but that's usually a choice that companies will choose to do if it's high volume and also in multiple states. From what I understand

 
Nick New 

That's what we do as an intermediary. Yes. What we were kind of getting into is what do intermediaries do? Yes, please. Our job is really to make it easy for you. Any of you want to do an apprenticeship program, we can help you go from standing start to a pilot relatively quickly and either help you learn to do it yourselves or do it for you. Right. And there are different types of intermediary and in our in our nature, we are ultimately an extension of somebody's HR team to make it happen, whether it's people strategy, grant funding, structuring, learning and so on. There are other intermediaries who hire people and lease them out to you and then place them in your organization and they operate like different mini schools. So you know, that's intermediaries are a great opportunity for businesses who might not Have the depth and breadth of the HR capability to take this on and run within or can't get clarity to that resource this quickly. I mean, if you want to be program in two years time, you need to start talking about it now.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

That's right. And you know, I was really impressed with IBM, they were on our 21st century, the CTA 21st century workforce council, still are. And they came to us and said, hey, we've got this apprenticeship program. I think we said they you guys started with like, 10 to 15.

 
Nick New 

first cohort had seven. Okay, cohort had five so it was Yeah, so,

 
Jennifer Taylor 

You know, if IBM is starting small, you know, that, that that that says a lot, right? So I they called me up and said, Hey, Jen, we want to share our platform and our approach with all of your member companies. And I said, Come on, and let's do this. And I'm just thrilled that we already have 40 companies and some have already registered, some are moving on to their cohorts, summer status. And, you know, evaluating process. But all are welcome. And our whole goal is to demonstrate that the tech industry is investing in new pathways and creating more opportunities for people who have been traditionally overlooked in tech. And we want to scale these in our industry. So before we take some questions, it's funny my watch says it's time to drink water. I you know, I just let's just go around quickly, and then we'll take questions. I'll start with you jab either what is what is the advice you would give to the audience or what was your big takeaway? You know, in the past year, now that you've offered apprenticeships,

 
Jeb Ory 

it's worth it. I mean, if 100 person company could do it, if your company's larger you could do it. So there's a lot of benefits and I think the the concept of a win win win is something that I didn't see initially that it can be really good for the apprentice can be good for the company and it can be good for the, you know, the broader community because we're creating and kind of transmitting skills to someone that didn't have them before. And that shows other people that they can do that to me inspire more people to go into the careers that we obviously need to fill.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Nick any advice you would give to the audience or what is a major lesson you've

 
Nick New 

I mean, having gone down the road of building out, you know, registered apprenticeship program standards and getting everything going, just get started and don't be afraid Come come and talk to us or people like us or the coalition. And let's you know, do some discovery and help you figure out how achievability is because it is accessible, it is achievable and it will make a massive difference. My advice to everybody is, be the hero in your organization. The these are proven strategies that will help solve your skills gap. We're all dealing with it right now. When you leave here today, think about one or two actions that you can take tomorrow to meet with your leaders to talk about stripping out a degree requirements to your to your technical jobs, working to shift the mindsets, taking out that bias and how we go about hiring and selecting individuals, tour organizations, and join the CTA coalition. I mean, any any member of the CTA can come in, there's no I mean, it's really a great organization where you're getting this collective collaboration from companies like Sony Bosh, small companies, large companies, that are really bringing these talent strategies. I mean, I just the the mindshare that happens on a monthly basis on our monthly calls is extraordinary. So I want to thank you for for facilitating and coordinating all that but

 
Nick New 

Takes a village.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

It does take a village

 
Charlie Ackerman 

Yeah, I would say the same thing. I don't think that I can add any new Anything more here but it is it get started. Get Started. Just get started. That's great.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

So any questions from the audience? Please?

 
Charlie Ackerman 

Did it need to be repaired?

 
Speaker 

We believe that these are actually local jobs. The risk here is that people don't really want to be close but when you do apprenticeship and one day punches yourself a business risk of 85 then you actually train someone to do a job in the country as an employee. The coalition of CTA defense program we have in place to communicate institution in the government, that companies on providing apprenticeships to employees.

 
Jennifer Oddo 

Yeah, I think we're at the beginning stages of really building out these modern day competency based apprenticeship programs. So there is still a lot of, of advocacy, education and enablement that we all need to do as an ecosystem to help everybody understand So, and again, you know, you talked about the deficit, we've got 630,000 jobs that we don't have the resources to fill at this hour. So you know, whether somebody is taking, you know, wants to take a gig role or in the gig economy or wants to be a full time employee, I think, you know, we've got to meet the employee, we've got to meet the talent where they're at in their career journey. And if that gig economy is something that they want to participate in? I think that's okay.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

They want to be a 1099.

 
Jeb Ory 

Well, I think that the the apprenticeship is a formal designation. So that is a full time employee that sanctioned by the state or the federal government. So it would not be as I understand it, it would not be a 1099. Right. So if you're trying to make a 1099 apprenticeship program, I think that'd be a different avenue. And it's definitely worth exploring. But that is, that's not really, the apprenticeship is actually this. This was something that I've learned over the last year is actually a formal designation. It's a name. It's not just like a trainee. It's an apprenticeship that has this official designation and certification. And I think it's

 
Nick New 

I mean, your question was really, if somebody wants to be a gig economy worker, can they get this training? That that's, I guess another question for the apprenticeship ecosystem at the moment because apprenticeships is about a contract between an individual and employer to get a career. So you have to employed as a full time employee?

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Yeah, the training is like a benefit being

 
Nick New 

the solution company but

 
Jennifer Oddo 

what we are starting to see emerge I think is very early stage is we you know, think of the staffing industry, right. We've got a lot of companies now coming into hire apprentices put them through a training boot camp and deploy them as a into companies to get the experience in the in the training they need. So I think as we continue to evolve the flex and understand the great flexibility, we're going to see all kinds of different models emerge of how we deploy these programs.

 
Speaker 

faced 500 people that didn't want the freedom, yeah, the way we thought about how to do that. Then the next thing is, actually the marketplace will actually keep the jobs. Jobs

 
Nick New 

I mean, the people We've spoken to some of whom are interested in doing apprenticeships in that framework. There are also people are interested in getting a skilled worker in three months that there isn't a framework for, but you can use the methodologies and the training and the so just get on with it. And if you want to do that you don't need the funding, you won't get the funding from an apprenticeship framework for that. But you might get some we our funds to contribute back to offset so so it exists, there's no real barrier, there's actually opportunities from state state labor to help you

 
Jeb Ory 

we can we can talk afterwards and we have a lot of clients that worked on a B five and have a lot of insights around that. But I think like at some level, you may need a lobby and try to get your particular employee class excluded because a lot of other people who managed to get carved out but but that's that probably becomes more of an advocacy and CTA is a great a great champion for for the the flexible workforce.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Any other questions from the group? Yes, please.

 
Speaker 

Computer Science and Engineering.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

Where what state? Are you in? California? Oh, me. Okay. Yeah.

 
Jennifer Oddo 

So the question was around how do high school students access the these apprenticeship programs and there's a couple different avenues. There was a new grant that was just put out last year. I think New America is actually the grantee of it. It's called the piaa. Grant. There's several states several organizations that are participating in this to help get youth apprenticeship and I think youth apprenticeship is defined 16 to 24 range. So there is some grassroots efforts going on to really build up these efforts and the Department of Labor has invested in that. And again, it's called pi up pa ye a, I encourage you to explore that. One of the other ways that you can your students can get involved is something that we've just starting to launch at IBM and it's a pre apprenticeship program. Pre apprenticeship programs, our training programs typically like our, you know, 80 to 100 hours, where we are teaching industry relevant skills, workforce ready skills for those individuals to be ready to come into an apprenticeship program. So there's a lot of work being done JFS. They're a wonderful workforce intermediary out of DC who is also piloting and really working with the Department of Labor to really promote the use of pre apprenticeships as well.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

And then also, if you're in the state of California, I would recommend reaching out and talking to the office of apprenticeship in the state of California Jen and I know the leadership there, we happy to connect you and then they can tell you specifically what's available in California.

 
Jennifer Oddo 

And I will say California and North Carolina, just come to mind of having wonderful programs but for your high school students. Pick up the phone, to your state agencies, your workforce board, even There's a lot of state agencies that could really help you understand what options are available to you.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

And we had the pleasure when we were at Sony, Jen and I, we had the Office of apprenticeship from California, they shared some really interesting stats, I'm going to try and do this from memory. They offer more apprentices, apprenticeship than any other state. Their state is like, if it were a country, it would be like one of the top 10 wasn't it? Like GDP? Like I mean, like it's different. Yeah, I mean, it I was I never really thought of it that way. And, but anyway, they really pride themselves on the number of apprenticeships they offer and their growth strategy so we can connect you with them.

 
Jennifer Taylor 

At what university Kettering. Yes, yes, I'm a Michigan person.

 
Speaker 

Correct Charlie, would you like to talk about how co ops can affect the talent pool? And then I guess secondly, can universities be a part of the the CTA coalition?

 
Charlie Ackerman 

Well, first off, we love Kettering. And we love co ops. And if I'm not mistaken, every year, we have, on average, about 65 of those come through our organization. So, and then when we start looking at the conversion rate, it actually gets up into the, you know, the 70 70%. So actually, we really do appreciate Kettering. Now, when when we're coming through and you think of the apprentice program, versus you know, the four year degree that we've got, I don't think that we've ever thought about me mixing the two at this point in time, you've got great programs, we are working with you on making sure that your curriculum stays relevant to the speed of the industry. That's the issue. Okay. As long as the curriculum stays at the pace that the industry is moving, that's good. What we find a lot of times is the educational institutions aren't responding fast enough. That's the, that's the gap. Okay. So, employers industry, what you have to do is you have to invite educators into your organization. That's another action that can be taken immediately. Do not wait. I mean, try to imagine I mean, all the different educational roles that are out there, you know, obviously you've got, you know, at the highest level with the state, then you get into the superintendent of education, you have your principals, but who is giving guidance to the students, guidance counselors.

 
Charlie Ackerman 

What do they know? What do they say? That's an element of concern, right? I think that Kettering gets it right. I think that we've got a great partnership. This is why we basically are on campus quite often. So we really do appreciate your relationship there.

 
Jennifer Oddo 

And if I can build on one piece that you know, chart Charlie's, it's not just about, you know, you know, education, doing their thing, industry doing their thing, the workforce bottle has really changed. We are now living in a real era where the education systems whether you're a four year college or a two year Community College, you need to find a way to partner with them as well. But on the flip side, some of the work that IBM is doing, we are partnering with some of the community colleges and universities ironically, to extend a pre apprenticeship program to them. So this is a training program to help address the fact that the educational systems can't keep up. So we are taking, you know, our product information that's that's that's sitting out there for training and we're giving it to the universities To help the those individuals or the students get ready for what the workforce needs. And at the end, there's apprenticeship jobs waiting. So think about your general study students who maybe don't have a clear compass, when they're coming out of their four year degree pathway. Now leveraging some of these apprenticeship models or industry training. Now, you can give them a way a pathway, put them through some aptitude testing, have them do the training. And at the end, not only do they have a four year degree, but they've got this tech pre apprenticeship program they've been through. So now they're armed and powerful in the marketplace, more so than they were with just that general study degree. So again, just the preface, I mean, we all got to work together the workforce intermediaries, the employers, the the higher education institutions and governments we are are part of the part of the solution. And we are not going to get the outcomes we need if we don't work together. takes a village.

 

Jennifer Taylor 

That is a great memory Jennifer odo I think with that, we're going to conclude the panel, just want to point out a couple of things. Please, if you're interested, download our white paper. And if you're interested in joining the coalition, reach out to me or talk to any of us. And I'm happy to talk to you about that. And then lastly, we have another amazing panel coming up, hosted by john Stoll from the Wall Street Journal. And we're going to talk about how Millennials are helping to modernize and make the workplace more productive, more efficient, more fun, more flexible, all that great stuff. So thank you all for coming.

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