Jean Foster 

Good morning, everybody. Welcome back to our third session of the morning and for those of you who are joining us for the first time Welcome to see 2020 we're on day two. We've had two brilliant sessions this morning. We've got four more to go. So hope you're going to be able to stick around with us today and really learn more about the intersection of the media marketing and the tech industry. Next up, we've got two great brands joining us on stage. The first HP is a long term, CTA partner and CES partner and exhibitor. And the second is a little bit new for us Pinterest, so I'm really interested in the periodic bring up of both those companies. So please join me in welcoming Ah, sorry, Pinterest cmo to the stage. Andrea Milord.

 
Andrea Mallard 

Morning, thank you. My name is Andrea Mallard. I'm the CMO of Pinterest. And I've been with the company for about a year. But honestly when I was approached with the job, it took me a minute to think about whether I wanted to join a tech company. This is one of my favorite quotes from Tim Cook, which is, of course, technology is capable of doing great things, but it doesn't always want to do great things. So when I was offered the job, I had to think about it for a minute. I think the world has really woken up to the fact that technology is not inherently positive. There are legitimate debates going on right now about the role that it plays in politics, and socio economics and policy choices. That's at the macro level at the micro level. It's no less concerning. And I think we probably all feel that as likely very frequent users of technology. I was reading some interesting statistics, and it's highly likely that your phone is the very first thing you touch every morning, and it's probably the last thing you touch at night. And during the day, you probably touch it 80 plus times I actually think that seems low to me. If I think about how many times I have to interact with my mobile phone The average American spends three and a half hours at least, or on average, rather on their phone. And I know plenty who say when they get their stats at the end of the day, it's much, much higher than that. So given all this and some of the concerns that we have about technology, what really brought me to Pinterest? Why would I join? Well, our mission is to bring everyone the inspiration to create a life they love. And there aren't a lot of places to do that. Actually, I'll be honest, I wasn't a huge Pinterest user before I joined I use it sometimes. But the more I've got into technology and learned about the mission of the company, the more optimistic I feel. Pinterest is personal media. We like to say it's about yourself, not your selfie. And there's just not that many places online where you were supposed to focus on your own life, your own dreams. It's really about planning for your future. A lot about other places online are really about observing someone else's past or present if we're being honest and it's really about ideas, people don't come to Pinterest debate opinions or to argue with each other. They come to build on the ideas of others, and see if they can apply them to their own lives. It's also been run by a team of who are extremely focused on the emotional outcomes that our technology drives. I was really impressed with this. And it's been true since day one. They are very, very concerned to say when people spend a lot of time on our platform, what does that do for their offline life? How does that make them feel? Does it contribute in a net positive way to their bigger world? Because inspiration is I've learned this actually. And it's hard about the urge to act. It's not the urge to watch or opine or even to admire something, but to act. Inspiration is literally about taking a life breath in and doing something with it. And we've been learning more and more at Pinterest, that it's precisely this real life action that is most likely to turn and create happiness in the real world for people Investing in your own life rather than trying to compete with the lives of others or with a superficial view of the life of others is what actually leads to the most robust and most lasting happiness. And what's been interesting for me as a non user until I joined Pinterest, in the past year, I've been inspired to act in all sorts of interesting ways. And I have felt that sort of emotional feeling of the benefits of getting offline to invest in my own everyday life. So here's some real examples. When I first joined, I had to build a retaining wall in my backyard, and I stumbled across this pen about backyard beekeeping. It's not something I ever would have thought to search for myself. And I got excited. I was like, maybe I could do this. So I ended up buying the hive this exact one which allows you to tap it like you might have beer keg and just get honey out of it without disturbing the bees. And honestly, it's brought me so much joy. It's the happiest part of my day is every day when I get home from work. I will go Go into the backyard and just observe these bees doing this miraculous thing. It's really changed sort of how I think about who I am because I'm contributing in some positively to nature. And it's gotten kind of crazier since then. So this is my youngest child Ed and our first harvest, which was like a complete meal as like Here, eat a whole bunch of honey because I was so proud of myself that I went and bought some labels and bought some jars. And we started canning, honey, and I literally have a thought I was like, do I just become a beekeeper? Like I said, who I am now, because it's been so much fun. There's been a lot of great fashion that you get to buy as a result as well. That is me in my backyard. I'm mostly terrified in this moment, but, but also very proud, because I was like, wow, this was something I discovered. I didn't know I could be this. And it's given me so much pleasure. Yes, it started online. Of course it did. But I get to actually experience it offline in a more meaningful way. Because I mentioned I have kids to whom are teenagers. And I have three questions. I think we all should about the role technology plays in their lives, especially as they're developing their son. sense of self. Now it's easy for me to say, Well, I let them use Pinterest, because of course I work here. But to be honest, I've actually really appreciated the role. It's been playing especially my daughter's life, my 13 year old daughter, she discovered Pinterest and said, Oh, it's about cooking. And she got smart. And she started to learn how to bake all sorts of cool cupcakes and cool recipes. And I really watched her gain confidence. Over the course of the years, she would text me at work and say, Hey, I found this cool pins you mind if I try it? And she was trying some really advanced stuff like with, you know, Chrome relays and exciting, exciting things that I didn't think certainly I would have never dared to do at 13. It got to the point that she was so good at it, she started winning local cupcake competitions. This is her winning our local Cupcake Wars. And she went up against a bunch of you know, 50 year old plus women, and she won the whole thing. And it was like, Wow, she really turned to me and said, climate Baker, of course. And so in a moment of her life, where she's trying to figure out who she is and develop her sense of identity. I'm really proud that she's not Comparing herself to the lives of her friends, or following people she doesn't even know too long and, and becoming obsessed with celebrity, I really want her to be investing in her own passions and actually trying to figure out what those are. This is my husband. And I hope the look on his face right now is fear and regret kind of mixed together because this is our house. And we decided, you know, we live in a house that was essentially built with popsicle sticks, and it was threatening to fall over some, okay, we have to fix this. And it's turned into a catastrophic disaster for the last year. And this is our kitchen, believe it or not. So the worst part of this whole experience was saying, like, we don't know how to think about how to rebuild this house. But the best part about it has been working together. And we've had this sort of ability to collaborate when we didn't have the words to describe what we wanted to think of what could be how do we build on the ideas of other people and start to imagine what Supposed to be together. What I love is that it's enabling me to make things way better than I could have on my own. It's letting me tap into other people in the healthiest way to say they've had a good idea if I mash those two ideas together and add to it, what that might become, I think that's a really positive potential use of technology. I'm not trying to turn this into a commercial of Pinterest, believe it or not, I think what I'm so excited to talk to Vic rent from HP about is the fact that more and more companies are starting to say, Hey, we need to be responsible. We need to be accountable for the role technology plays in people's lives, the emotional outcomes, it drives and see how do we design for this outcomes? It's possible you can design technology that doesn't overwhelm your life. But that unleashes it. And again, when you think back to how many of us spend three, four or five hours a day online, I think that's a question we all really need to be asking ourselves. To what extent is this improving my life, making me happier than it was before I had access to this algae. Just one example of designing for outcomes. You found it at Pinterest that actually a lot of people use it to de stress. So at the end of a long day, they might say I had a tough day at work. I have a lot of anxiety, I'm just going to check in and look at some cool stuff and feel inspired. But we wanted to do more than that. So for we created something that we call compassionate search. For people who are entering things like anxiety or stress, which a lot of people were searching on Pinterest solutions for that. We partnered with Stanford medicine to say, what is the best thing we could give them at that moment for someone feeling that? So right now, if you were to put in anything like this, you wouldn't just get quotes, or phone numbers or resources, you would actually get an online experience to walk you through some peer reviewed, proven evidence based techniques to feel less anxious to feel less stressed. It's a small example. But I think it's a great example of how you can design for the outcomes you want in there. real world, even using technology like this. So without further ado, I am so pleased to introduce Vikrant Batra, the CMO of HP who's going to talk about some of the work they're doing and hopefully inspire us to think about how we can use our positions in our companies to inspire positive change. Thank you. Welcome.

 
Vikrant Batra 

I was so excited to be here. Then I realized backstage you're a backyard beekeeper and I almost didn't walk on the stage.

 
Andrea Mallard 

I recommend it to everyone. So before we even start, I over the holidays, I saw a really interesting commercial from HP. That speaks a little bit to some of these issues that I raised. And I don't want if you don't mind, can we play it now and I'd love to ask you some questions about it. Right?

 
Andrea Mallard 

Wonderful. So I guess round of applause for that. So I started this was called I think the get real campaign and there was a whole series of this. I would just love to know what inspired this. And why HP why now what what's your voice in this conversation?

 
Vikrant Batra 

Is a Real simple thing was there was one stat. Yeah. Before I get to the stat, you know, people get together in the holidays, whatever those holidays may be, whether it's Christmas or Hanukkah, they get together because they want to be with family. There was a stat that said that families got together for about three or four days during the holidays. There was a total of 300 hours of solo screen time that was being spent. And so about three years ago, they really stopped connecting. That was interesting. What was also interesting was most people wanted, they wanted to know how to get out of it. And there's a lot of anxiety when that happens to you know, for us You know, we've been around for eight years as a company. And we've always held the belief that you have to be responsible for the technology you make. And you have to be responsible for communicating the good and the bad of it. And for this, I know we're in the printing business. So it makes sense. We're also in the screen business. So number one, makers of screens when a PC business in the world, when you saw that people are spending 300 hours when they get together and fly in from everywhere, just to get together and look at their phones. And the real holidays, we're not being separated the way the way they should be. It really inspired us to kind of go out there and even if this commercial triggered, one thought in a few people's minds that I just need to put my phone down for a little bit, or just close my laptop for a little bit and actually talk to the person in front of me. You know, then it worked and, you know, just maybe me saying That fear makes 50% of the people here who are looking at the screens. Five of them look away and look at us. That'd be good. So

 
Andrea Mallard 

what? And what has been a bit of the reaction that you've seen to this commercial to the good to the bad? Who said, What have people been saying that the good or be the same? Have you heard? You know, hey, yeah.

 
Vikrant Batra 

both got a lot of good response. But we also got a lot of, okay, Boomer response to it. And it's real, right? Because look, at the end of the day, we're not going to, you can't preach to people. Hey, stop using your phone, you're using your phone too much. You can have your point of view. I know I don't want to check my phone 80 times a day. But somebody else may love doing that. It may just be a fantastic part of the day and you gotta you can't put your judgment on someone else. So you'll get reactions after you make a statement. But I think on both sides, and it's totally fine. It's what you're not trying to tell everyone. This is how you should behave. So we got a lot of Okay, boom. And that's fine, because there's a lot of people who go, you know what, I'm totally fine using my screens and not interacting. And that works for me. And that's fine. But I think that what's important for us is as a company, if that's what you believe in, then you talk about it. And don't be worried about how the reaction you get. Because you know, people people have their point of view, and that's fine.

 
Andrea Mallard 

Yeah. One thing we talk at Pinterest about a lot is designing for certain behaviors. And the responsibility we have is a major major tech platform to how do you design for positive emotional outcomes? And what does that mean, you know, in the day to day choices that we have to make as a business, you know, I'm curious at HP, what kind of conversations are you having and what kind of design choices can you make in the products that you're building you think are responsible in that way?

 
Vikrant Batra 

It's a great question. You know, it reminds me of something we did recently. You know, one of the biggest things that Gen Z is worried about when they're working on a laptop is who's spying on them by hacking into the cam. And it is a bit it was one of the biggest concerns because that happens all over the world. We sometimes have a US context on it. And that one inside led us to a design review of our consumer laptops, we actually have on the right hand side now, a hard webcam kill switch. So you can literally hit that switch and it kills your webcam from inside. And so that's something that is, from an emotional perspective, a huge positive for someone to go. If my laptop's open and I'm playing music, and I'm sitting in a hotel Wi Fi on the free Wi Fi, I know I can hit that switch and the webcam is dead. I don't care who else if the Wi Fi is secure Wi Fi or not, no one's gonna hack into my computer and look at me. So thanks Like that we do a lot of that now because it's, it's, you know, it's it's it's emotion based design in a way. Yeah.

 
Andrea Mallard 

And how are you going about getting insights for those emotions. So that's one I think someone might literally tell you, I'm afraid of someone's spying on me in my bedroom, for example. One thing we've learned at Pinterest, though is is many times people don't realize that the way they're feeling is linked to some of their online habits or is linked to the technology's role in their life. So, you know, people will say, Well, I spent four or five hours on social media or doing or, you know, waste what feels like a waste of time, perhaps when it's over. And then I feel really depressed and sad, but they don't necessarily make the connection between those two things. How does your team get some of the insights where people don't say perhaps directly what is at issue for them?

 
Vikrant Batra 

You know, there's, when it comes to use of technology. There is a lot of fantastic companies out there who are doing a lot of deep work in this so everyone from comments Media, you know, we now working with them a lot. When it comes to, you know, there's, we have a panel actually where we're doing a one day panel with people like Sherry Turkle from MIT, who have done an amazing amount of research. She's written two books, one called alone together, which is how kids are now interacting and alone together and then about reclaiming conversation. So it's it's really reaching out and working with experts like those who've done a lot of deep understanding of what those psychological and emotional behaviors and attitudes are, versus superficial insights research, which is going to give you data points, but

 
Andrea Mallard 

just, you know, one thing we every year at Pinterest, we run something called the Pinterest 100, which is trying to predict a little bit based on some behavior on the platform. What is coming in the future in 2021 of the biggest insights we had this year was so many people are now searching for things like Tech detox social media detox and and, and very popular on the platform and 2020 are things that we call rewilding, like getting out into nature. And I'm curious, are any of these kinds of these trends that are starting to emerge affecting how you guys are thinking about your products?

 
Vikrant Batra 

Um, I think there are a, by the way, I do think that this trend is real. I was reading some stats the other day that paperback books in the last three years are up over 20% or something like that. And ebooks are down 20%. And so it's the there's the balance that starting to to form. You know, how how we look at how we look at some of this stuff is like, I feel like you know, we're, we're in the printing business. We've we've been in the printing business for a long time. And we've worked a lot with educators, whether they're in the printing, you know, from a printing perspective or a screen perspective. To see what I'll give you an education example, how kids retain more when there is the right balance of screen and paper. How kids learn more, when does the right balance of screen and paper. You know, a lot of teachers, if you look at public schools are starting to durka backlash when the schools in certain states that are not allowing teachers to spend money to buy paper format, in their class, to actually have kids ride out and solve problems for some of us who grew up in the 70s and 80s. Like that, that's how we answer to there is a lot of things going on where we are spending a lot of time and a lot of these places, understanding what's going on and then how can we provide solutions. It's funny, I was reading an article the other day Google did a project called the paper phone. I don't know if anyone here is heard of that. Which is a A really interesting app for the paper phone, you can download it on your on your phone. And it allows you to create a paper version of your phone for the day by just saying everything you want to do and you put leave your phone at home and you walk away to spit the phone. I mean, it's, it's a bit of a gimmick, but it's beautifully designed thing. So I do think I don't think it's a trend that's going to go away. It's not a fad. I think that people are starting to find a balance, but it's gonna take a while.

 
Andrea Mallard 

What I think is interesting, as I think about my teenagers, you know, I grew up in a household where I remember saying to my dad when I was four years old, like put down your cigarette at the breakfast table, play out flight, please don't smoke at the breakfast table. Yeah. And my kids will say, please put down your phone mom at the breakfast table, you know, and so I wonder if this next generation Gen a, in that case, not even Gen Z might just have a greater degree of literacy because maybe they felt some of the more negative effects of having all of us adults being so distracted and pulled in so many different directions all the time.

 
Vikrant Batra 

Yep. Look, I think it's said two things. One, I don't mean to preach. But I do believe it is the responsibility of technology companies and platforms to help people understand the positives and negatives. It's not just enough to say, here's our tech, and if you are overusing it, and if it's causing you anxiety when you don't use it, that's your problem. I don't think that's right. I do think that there was some great research that came through. And there was a great movie called The like movie, it's a documentary. If you haven't seen it, you should go see it. Or they said that for Gen Z. The feelings they have about the phone, and the parts of your brain that light up when Gen Z talks about their phone is the same part of the brain that lights up when you talk about someone you love. And so the attachment to your phone your screen It's so much. And then when that phone is not there for a minute, they can't find where they left it. The levels of anxiety that the brain is exhibiting are terrible. And so, you know, these things should be tools screen should be tools that help us. And we talked about that a lot of my PC business that enable collaboration, then enable real connections that enable creativity. They shouldn't become addictions. So it's a belief we have.

 
Andrea Mallard 

We're obviously at CES, which is a wonderful place to celebrate, you know, again, that there is incredible things that technology is enabling is unleashed in people's lives. Is there anything that whether or not you've seen it here or that you're aware of that you're excited about where you say, Hey, this is something that I really predict is going to be really important to my business to all of our businesses in the coming years.

 
Vikrant Batra 

Although the impossible pork look, I think You know, I think overall, the part of sustainability. You know, a few years ago, we started to see a tremendous amount of sustainable innovation at CES. And I, I feel like was was starting to get to a place where it's, it's more than a nice to have it starts to become a must have. I was very, very happy to see that Sony is venturing into EV car now which is which is great. And I think a lot of this this needs to stop becoming a fad and start to become mainstream because that's how we're going to make a difference and it's something we believe in. So I think I'm excited to see a lot of a lot of sustainability based innovation here.

 
Andrea Mallard 

What kind of stuff is is he thinking about as far as sustainability How do you think you guys will contribute to to leading that conversation forward in the coming years,

 
Vikrant Batra 

you know, in a big way, biggest kept secret? December we were just news we came up with the most responsible come Please list and we will number one, which surprised a lot of people. But whether it's from a sustainability perspective, you know, we were one of the first to sign the Paris agreements we we are going to be fully renewable electricity. By 2025 across the world and all our offices and operations we're doing we've reduced already 47% of our global footprint in greenhouse gases in the last four years, we're going to take that as 60. In the next two more years. We just launched the product, the elite dragon fly the lightest product in the world laptop, the entire planet. Most of the plastic is made from ocean bound plastics. And most people don't know in if you buy an HP printer, and then you buy that really awesome ink. 60% of the ink cartridge plastic is made from ocean bound plastic We're collecting in Haiti, which had a serious problem after the earthquake with a lot of bottled water shipped in. And that bottle, those empty bottles end up in the ocean, and then become microplastics. And so we've been collecting all these bottles back from just offshore, converting them into plastics for a lot of our products. So we have huge goals to take our portfolio. We just launched a renewable packaging and sleeves for our products, which is going to start to become more mainstream that are completely compostable. We're going to be by the end of 2020. All our packaging is going to come only from sustainable forests. All our paper, HP paper that you print on already comes from hundred percent sustainable zero deforestation forests. So we've been somewhat a silently working on sustainability for a long, long time, including the entire supply chain so we haven't stopped at what we do. It's what our suppliers will do and whether they're in Malaysia and Thailand. Or in China, and including that as part of a chain. So we are very serious about it. Because you know, our founders, Bill and Dave, killer sometimes I hear HP being called an old fashioned brand ego like, you know, maybe it's time for old fashioned values. or five founders million Dave really believed. Hewlett and Packard really believe that you your company operates in a community, you're responsible to the community, and you're responsible to the people you sell your product to, and the communities that they belong to. And, you know, they always believed at years ago, that we need to leave a better planet than what we were what we were born into. And I think that's a big part of what we do. So

 
Andrea Mallard 

final question. Thank you so much. And I agree. I mean, obviously, we've all been thinking about people in planet profits as our triple bottom line, but I also think, again, is growing awareness of mental health issues and router happiness is all starting to come together realizing you need to clean up all these environments environment, the brain, the environment of the neighborhood, the environment of the community, what would be the one piece of advice you might offer to other leaders in this room who are trying to think about, again, holistic impact of their businesses on the world? But what advice would you offer them?

 
Vikrant Batra 

You know, there's marketers in this room, I would say, start talking about, start talking about the values that your company is based on, and start to drive that not just for your own company and for telling a story to customers. But more importantly, because when you start talking about the values of your company, which will lead to an overall, when you start talking about the values of the company, you'll be surprised how much you will trigger in others the need to do good. And I think that's really important because, you know, look at us, your company, our company, we sell, we have millions of people in interact with our brand, millions of people who buy our brands, the ability for companies like ours to make an impact and spread the message are huge. And if we don't do that, that's the problem. So I would say talk about the values of your company, spread those values of your company and then you know, some point of time will have a collective consciousness that goes and that will flip the conversation wherever you want to start doing it. So

 
Andrea Mallard 

Thank you so much. Thank you very much.

 
Jean Foster 

Thank you, Andrea and vagrant for the interesting session. So now we're going to be the stage is going to be going dark for the next hour or so. So grab some lunch recharge, and then we'll be back at one o'clock for a really interesting afternoon. We're going to have WP peace. Read onstage with us. We're gonna have an interesting tech debate led by Sarah fisher of axios. But we're going to kick off the afternoon session at one o'clock with amazon music. You're going to bring on stage a real superstar, Grammy Award winning singer songwriter, an all round heroine of mine, Alicia Keys. You want to get here early for that one because it's going to be standing room only. So please join us back here at one o'clock. Thank you.

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